3 Questions Wednesday with Rosey Lee

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday! Today Inspired Prompt welcomes author and publisher, Rosey Lee  Thanks for taking the time to join us.

First question:
Who is your favorite author?
Rosey: There’s a special place in my heart for Dr. Maya Angelou’s work. I’m captivated by her ability to make her autobiographical work read like fiction. And she lived a fascinating life. I love to read different authors, and it’s hard to choose a favorite. But if I was forced to only read one author’s work for the rest of my life, it would probably be hers.

I love hearing her read her work. She’s got a great voice. Next question…
If you could write about anyone or anything fiction/nonfiction who or what would you write about?

Rosey: I would continue to write about families. I’m intrigued with the construction and role of families and how family members interact with each other. There are so many different types of families and a plethora of complexities that exist with them. I could write about families forever and never get bored.

Interesting. Families can have many layers to tell stories from. Last question: If you could spend time with a character from your book or another book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day?

Rosey:  I would definitely hang out with Gran. I dedicated my flash fiction collection to my grandmothers and great-grandmothers. Gran isn’t exactly like any of them, but she shares some of their characteristics. Gran has led an intriguing life, and I would spend time with her in hopes that she might share stories of her adventures. If she felt up to it, we would also cook together. Gran knows her way around the kitchen, and I would try to get some of her secret family recipes. But something tells me she’d catch on pretty quickly and would just tease me with them the whole day.

Grandmothers are very special people! Thanks for stopping by.

Click to tweet: I would continue to write about families. I’m intrigued with the construction and role of families and how family members interact with each other. There are so many different types of families and a plethora of complexities that exist with them. I could write about families forever and never get bored.


Book Blurb:

Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 1 and Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 2 explore the connections that can hold people together or tear them apart. The stories in this collection capture struggles that are common in today’s families—secrets, mother-daughter conflicts, coping with aging family members, and a more subtle question of what makes a family. The issues will seem familiar to you, but there are unexpected twists when you least expect them. The relatable characters and endings may pull at your heartstrings, so don’t be surprised if you laugh or cry along the way. Like most families, the relationships in this uplifting collection consist of intricate elements. Sometimes things get messy, but it’s always beautiful. Each volume contains five flash fiction stories (very short stories of 1000 words or less each). Read each story in about 5 minutes and get Volume 2 of the collection for free using a link within Volume 1.

Get Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 1 on:


About Rosey Lee

Rosey Lee writes uplifting fiction stories about family and friendship. A native of the Westbank of New Orleans, Louisiana, Rosey is a fan of good food and a good time. As a child, she dreamed of a career in writing, fashion design, and acting. She uses the pen name Rosey Lee as she pursues her passion for writing. Her alter ego is a physician who has dedicated her career to individual and community-based approaches to health equity. She enjoys cooking, flower arranging, listening to live music, and occasional bursts of fanatical bargain shopping.

Rosey’s flash fiction has appeared in Necessary Fiction, Bending Genres, Barren Magazine, Turnpike Magazine, The Wellington Street Review, and elsewhere. Her work has also been nominated for the 2019 Best of the Net anthology. Connect with her at roseyleebooks.com and @roseyleebooks on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Five Strategies to a Successful Launch Team

A launch team can be a great asset for an author. They provide the author with early reviews, a way of spreading the word about his book to a variety of social circles, and they give the author more leverage on social media. They are his peeps.

Launch teams are a must.

Great launch teams.

Great launch teams shout from the mountain tops.

But what happens when an author is unclear about his goals for the launch? Well, things can get messy quick. Instead of the launch team being a group of positive supporters, they can become another obstacle for the author to overcome.

In order to avoid a break down in launch team etiquette, here are five strategies to put into place before the launch team ever gets started.

  • Make a list of supporters

Make a list of potential Launch Team members who you think will follow through on their commitment to you and who are enthusiastic and positive about your work. This list doesn’t have to be long. It is better to go for quality over quantity. You want those on your list to include friends and family who are cheering for your success and super fans who have been following your writing career.

You may also want to think of any influencers you may know, or people located in other parts of the country or the world. This will automatically add new social circles to your launch and broaden your reach to potential readers.

  • Set your Goals

Before you contact anyone on your list, sit down and set some clear goals for your team. What is it that you need your team to do?

Is your focus on getting them to leave reviews, or do you want them to concentrate more on their social media contacts? Or is your focus more on handing out swag and word of mouth marketing? Whatever your focus is, be sure to communicate it concisely to your team.

  •  Set up social media copy

Since you are enlisting the help of others, you want to make it as easy as possible for them. So, you need to provide the social media copy for your launch team. This will entail both memes with your book cover on it and interesting pictures that play on some aspect of the story. This gives your launch team a variety of choices and keeps the interest of their social media friends from waning.

You will also want to provide the copy to go along with the pictures. Use a quote from one of your characters or vibrant description of a place in your book. Think outside the box on this one.

  • Make a calendar

To keep everyone on the same page, use your goals to create a calendar of events. When does the book need to be read by? Have that on the calendar. When should the launch team post reviews? Again, have that on a calendar. By putting everything in one place, you not only keep everyone in step, but it acts as a reminder of what should be happening and when.

The less your team members have to plan and do for themselves, the more likely they are to follow through and help you spread the word. You want to make it as fun and easy as possible for your people.

Say thank you to your launch team.

Always say Thank You. It means so much.

  • Plan to say “Thank You”

Be sure to include in your planning a way to say thank you to your team. If everyone does what is asked, they will have given you many hours of their time and lots of their energy.

So, work into your calendar of events, some giveaways for your team. Make them unique and special. Maybe a tee-shirt with a cool launch team name on it like “The Dream Team” or maybe a mug that says, “llama tell you about my Launch Team”. Be creative but make it something meaningful to your people.

Launch teams are a valuable set of people who can help an author achieve success. These strategies should help to pave the road to a happy partnership in this adventure of writing. If used wisely, launch team members can become an author’s number one source of encouragement and information.

Click-to-Tweet: #HowTo #BookLaunch – A launch team can provide the author with early reviews, a way of spreading the word about his book to a variety of social circles, and they give the author more leverage on social media.

Prompt: Jan sat her dinning room table with the pen and paper in her hand. Who was she going to ask to be on her launch team? She hated to impose, but …

Bio head shot for Inspiration Blog - 2017Bonita Y. McCoy hails from the Great State of Alabama where she lives on a five-acre farm with two cows, two dogs, two cats, and one husband who she’s had for over thirty years. She is a mother to three grown sons and two beautiful daughters-in-law, one who joined the family from Japan. She loves God, and she loves to write. Her blog, articles, and novels are an expression of both these passions.

Drop by and visit her Facebook Author’s Page or Instagram page or visit her website bonitaymccoy.com where you can find her books, blog, and all the other things she might be doing.

No Room In His Heart  NoRoomInHisHeart_Final_ebook

On Amazon

Truth Be Told     TruthBeTold_Cover_rev7-19_ebook

On Amazon 

Writing Insights with Rosey Lee

Thank you for having me! I’m Rosey Lee. My stories are usually about relationships between family members and friends–the ups, the down, and everything in between. Most of us are dealing with heavy things in real life, so I try to make my stories hopeful but real. My author’s tagline is “Uplifting stories with a little bit of hope, faith, and love.”

What do you love most about the writing process? I love that writing often helps me process things that I see happening in the world every day. I kind of think about life as a story. Maybe that came from reading parables when I was growing up. I frequently think about what my story would be if someone told it. It seems a narrative perspective is always with me, so I try to put it front and center when I write.

If you could give advice to your younger writing self, what would it be? I would say to listen the inner voice that said, “Hey, you’re pretty good at this writing thing.” I always knew that I wanted to write books, but there was a part of me that wondered if I was good enough to do it. So I wasn’t proactive about writing. If I’d believed that I was good enough at some pivotal moments, I’d have sought opportunities to develop myself as a writer when my schedule was more flexible.

What are common traps for aspiring writers? I think it’s easy to get stuck ruminating on the obstacles we’ve faced and what we haven’t done. We should give ourselves more grace. So often, aspiring writers are too hard on themselves for not taking their writing seriously in the past, and they get stuck there. They don’t write because they’re disappointed in themselves for not writing when they were younger, when they had more time, when they didn’t have such a demanding job, when they didn’t have kids, when they didn’t have so many responsibilities, or whatever. That type of thinking becomes a barrier and can prevent us from getting started or prevent our work from being more impactful.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? I’ve taken some amazing writing classes. My first online writing class taught me about flash fiction, which eventually led to my new flash fiction collection – Beautiful, Complicated Family. I’ve since participated in an online writing boot camp and several online writing workshops that helped me to learn about flash fiction and provided a supportive environment and feedback on the stories I created during the sessions.

Do you read your book reviews? How do you deal with good or bad ones? Yes, I do. Of course, it’s important not to fixate on positive or negative reviews. But so far, I’ve found book reviews to be helpful overall. As a new writer, its motivating to see which themes resonated with readers and that I’m hitting my target of providing uplifting content. I want readers to enjoy my stories, but I also hope the stories impact them on a deeper level. If those things aren’t happening consistently, I need to make some tweaks. Of course, you can’t make everyone happy, and I also like to understand why someone doesn’t like something about my stories. But I always remind myself not to take it personally. As they say, “everything ain’t for everybody.”

What is your current WIP? I’m working on a novel about a family that’s forgotten what family is about. I suppose it’s still in keeping with the overarching theme of my flash fiction collection, because the family in my WIP is beautiful yet complicated. Then again, aren’t most families?


Click to tweet: I’m Rosey Lee. My stories are usually about relationships between family members and friends–the ups, the down, and everything in between. Most of us are dealing with heavy things in real life, so I try to make my stories hopeful but real. My author’s tagline is “Uplifting stories with a little bit of hope, faith, and love.”


About the Author:

Rosey Lee writes uplifting fiction stories about family and friendship. A native of the Westbank of New Orleans, Louisiana, Rosey is a fan of good food and a good time. As a child, she dreamed of a career in writing, fashion design, and acting. She uses the pen name Rosey Lee as she pursues her passion for writing. Her alter ego is a physician who has dedicated her career to individual and community-based approaches to health equity. She enjoys cooking, flower arranging, listening to live music, and occasional bursts of fanatical bargain shopping.

Rosey’s flash fiction has appeared in Necessary Fiction, Bending Genres, Barren Magazine, Turnpike Magazine, The Wellington Street Review, and elsewhere. Her work has also been nominated for the 2019 Best of the Net anthology. Connect with her at roseyleebooks.com and @roseyleebooks on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Book Blurb:
Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 1 and Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 2 explore the connections that can hold people together or tear them apart. The stories in this collection capture struggles that are common in today’s families—secrets, mother-daughter conflicts, coping with aging family members, and a more subtle question of what makes a family. The issues will seem familiar to you, but there are unexpected twists when you least expect them. The relatable characters and endings may pull at your heartstrings, so don’t be surprised if you laugh or cry along the way. Like most families, the relationships in this uplifting collection consist of intricate elements. Sometimes things get messy, but it’s always beautiful. Each volume contains five flash fiction stories (very short stories of 1000 words or less each). Read each story in about 5 minutes and get Volume 2 of the collection for free using a link within Volume 1.

Get Beautiful, Complicated Family: Volume 1 on:

 

Help! I’m a Writer, NOT a Speaker

by: Shirley Crowder

At writers’ conferences, I often hear people say, “I’m a writer, not a speaker!” That statement is followed by an explanation of why they aren’t a speaker that usually includes them being afraid of public speaking.

© Can Stock Photo / theblackrhino

I’m sure most of us can relate to that sentiment! We are very comfortable sitting alone and writing. Yet, if we want people to know us and be familiar with our books and our name, we need to seek opportunities to speak.

Speaking engagements can generate income through paid events and book sales at the event. It enables you to connect one-to-one with people and get a clearer understanding of what interests them most about your writing. You receive free publicity because those attending will post it on their social media and tell all their friends about you and your books. And, it only costs you time.

Here are fifteen things that help me stand in front of a group and speak without fainting or getting sick to my stomach.

PRAY – Ask the Lord to help you learn to be a good speaker.

BREATHE – Remember to breathe deeply and often.

GO TO THE RESTROOM AND DON’T DRINK TOO MUCH BEFORE YOU SPEAK – I don’t think an explanation is needed here, right?

LEARN TO SPEAK WELL – Find three-to-four people whom you think are good speakers. Listen to them and make note of the things you like and don’t like about their speaking. I’m not talking about content here—I’m talking about delivery. Listen for techniques to learn, not things to mimic. We use critique partners for writing; why not use them for our speaking also?

BE YOURSELF – Don’t try to be someone else. Let your own personality shine through when you speak.

STAND UP STRAIGHT – Not only is standing up straight good posture, but it will also help open your lungs up so oxygen flows easily to your brain and you have enough breath so you can speak an entire sentence without taking a breath. Hold your head up high and make eye contact.

DON’T WEAR NEW SHOES – Be sure your shoes are broken in and comfortable to stand for the period of time you will speak and answer questions. It’s hard to concentrate on what you want to say when your feet are throbbing with pain.

DON’T STAND IN ONE PLACE – I don’t mean pace around so much that you make your audience dizzy as they try to watch you. Even if you have a fixed-position mic on a stand you can move to the left and right. This will help you not be so tense, and the movement will help your audience focus on what you’re saying.

SPEAK SLOWLY – Speak slower than you normally speak in casual conversations. Enunciate clearly.

CHANGE YOUR VOLUME AND TONE – Be sure to emphasize certain words or fluctuate your volume, as appropriate and mix up your tone of voice. This will help keep the listeners’ attention. Even the most mundane information, when delivered with fluctuating voice volume and tone can grab peoples’ attention.

GET RID OF “FILLER” WORDS AND SOUNDS – I heard an author speak at our local public library recently. In the first eight minutes of his talk, he said, “Uhhhhh ….” 63 times—and yes, I did count! In the same way, our editors tell us to be concise in our writing, be concise in your speaking.

DOUBLE-CHECK YOUR NOTES – Make sure you have everything and that it is in the correct order in time to get everything ready.

HAVE WATER CLOSE AT-HAND – Even if you’re like me and talk a lot all time, your mouth can get dry. Keep water where you can take a sip if needed. The more formal speaking the setting, the drier my mouth gets. It’s hard to speak clearly when your tongue sticks to the roof of your mouth.

DO NOT MAKE SELF-DEROGATORY REMARKS OR APOLOGIZE – I heard a speaker begin her talk saying, “Sorry they couldn’t get a good speaker and you’re stuck with me—I don’t know anything.” If I had not been the next person to speak, I would have left at that moment. Why in the world would I want to stay and hear someone speak for forty-five minutes when they don’t know anything?

ACKNOWLEDGE AUDIENCE RESPONSES – If the audience claps or laughs during your talk, give that time to die down before you continue, otherwise, people may not hear the next thing you have to say.

HUMBLY ACCEPT COMPLIMENTS – When people are moved by or like what you said, they will be excited to tell you how great or meaningful your talk was. Do not deflate their excitement by not accepting the compliment. “Thank you” is always an appropriate response. I usually respond with something like, “Thank you. I’m grateful the Lord enabled me to speak and share with you.”

With prayer and practice, you can go from a scared speaker to a confident speaker.

© Can Stock Photo / Aleutie

I’ll end with what for Christ-followers is the foundational principle on which we stand for everything: When God calls us to do something, he prepares, equips, and enables us to do it! Remember Moses?

Then Moses said to the Lord, “O my Lord, I am not eloquent, neither before nor since You have spoken to Your servant; but I am slow of speech and slow of tongue.” So the Lord said to him, “Who has made man’s mouth? Or who makes the mute, the deaf, the seeing, or the blind? Have not I, the Lord? Now therefore, go, and I will be with your mouth and teach you what you shall say.”

(Exodus 4:10-11 NKJV)

Click to tweet: When God calls us to do something, he prepares, equips, and enables us to do it! Remember Moses? https://ctt.ec/6Wa60+ #Public Speaking

Writing Prompt: Fiction writers: Prepare a two-minute talk about one of your fictional characters. Non-fiction writers: Prepare a two-minute talk about a topic in your book.

3 Questions Wednesday with Denise Weimer

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday! Today Inspired Prompt welcomes author and publisher, Denise Weimer! Thanks for taking the time to join us.

First question:
Who is your favorite author?

Denise: I have to admit, I struggle with favorites. I do better with types. I adore the writing of authors who are able to place me in edge-of-my-seat awe. I want to admire the characters even as I relate to them. I want to feel as they do. I want to see and smell and hear as they do. I want to hold my breath as they encounter places and challenges outside their comfort zones.

Because of this, I also admit to a penchant for frontier historical romance. It can be any frontier in any time period—just take me with your characters to the edge of what’s known and nudge me beyond. Meanwhile, making the page crackle with attraction between the hero and heroine. When there are almost insurmountable obstacles, it’s all the sweeter when the two at last come together. I’ve particularly enjoyed the novels of Laura Frantz, Francine Rivers, Michelle Griep, and Shannon McNear.

Love it, I’m on the edge with the anticipation you’ve described.  Next question…
If you could write about anyone or anything fiction/nonfiction who or what would you write about?

Denise: I’ve written about most of the things I originally wanted to write about as a starry-eyed twenty-year-old. My first desire was to pen a sweeping saga set in North Georgia during the mid-1800s, and I did that with my Georgia Gold Series. I incorporated deep spiritual truths time-slip-style into The Restoration Trilogy. And the urge I’d had to explore the Revolutionary War Battle of Kettle Creek in Georgia was captured in Across Three Autumns of The Backcountry Brides Collection. I’ve ventured into contemporary romance and romantic suspense with Fall Flip and my two spring 2020 releases, Traces and Spring Splash—in which I even got to encapsulate experience from my years as a swim mom. I’ve also delved into the rich Cherokee history of my state which has always held a fascination for me with The Witness Tree and a novel currently looking for a publishing home. Now I wait for whatever God prompts me to write or something for which He opens a door. In everything, my goal is to write whatever story He lays on my heart.

Wow, sounds like you’ve stayed focused on your goals for writing about different times in history. Last question: If you could spend time with a character from your book or another book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day?

Denise: I would walk the streets of Old Salem, North Carolina, with Clarissa Vogler Kliest, my heroine in The Witness Tree. I’d love to hear from her personally about life in that Williamsburg-like town in 1805, life as a Moravian lady who entered into a marriage of convenience arranged by the lot. Curious about what the lot was? You can guess where to begin Clarissa’s story?

I’m intrigued. There are many times I want to crawl inside the book and fully experience the setting, and get to know the characters as friends. Thanks for stopping by.

Click to tweet: Now I wait for whatever God prompts me to write or something for which He opens a door. In everything, my goal is to write whatever story He lays on my heart.

Denise Weimer is offering to give away a book! Comment on this post that you would like to be included in the drawing and any other comment. We will draw a name on Wednesday, November 13th.


Fall Flip:

The tragic death of Shelby Dodson’s husband—her partner in a successful Home Network house flipping business—stole love, status, and career. Now a bungalow redesign thrusts Shelby into the company of a new contractor. Scott Matthews remembers high-and-mighty Shelby from high school, and her prissy, contemporary style goes against his down-to-earth grain. When the house reveals a mystery, will its dark secrets—and their own mistakes—cost a second chance at love?

The Witness Tree:
Past betrayal has turned John Kliest’s passion to his work as a builder and surveyor in the Moravian town of Salem, North Carolina. Now, to satisfy the elders’ edict and fulfill his mission in Cherokee Territory, he needs a bride. But the one woman qualified to record the Cherokee language longs for a future with his younger brother.

Clarissa Vogler’s dream of a life with Daniel Kliest is shattered when she is chosen by lot to marry his older brother and venture into the uncharted frontier. Can she learn to love this stoic man who is now her husband? Her survival hinges on being able to trust him—but they both harbor secrets.


Denise Weimer writes historical and contemporary romance and romantic suspense set in her home state of Georgia. She’s authored over nine novels and a number of novellas. As a managing editor at Smitten Historical Romance and Heritage Beacon Fiction, Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas, she also helps others reach their publishing dreams. A wife and mother of two daughters, Denise always pauses for coffee, chocolate, and old houses.