Hope by Fay Lamb

I’m thrilled to welcome back to the blog, my friend, author extraordinaire, Fay Lamb. She helped me when I first joined the Scribes critique group as a newbie. I don’t think I could have made it without her constant encouragement. So what’s she up to these days? Let’s see…

Tell us a little about yourself and your background.

Fay: My husband and I have lived in Titusville, Florida, our entire lives though we didn’t met until we were in our twenties. We are actually fifth generation Titusvillians and two more generations (our two sons and our six grandchildren) follow us. We’re all still here in this small town where the building of a new bridge is entertainment, and don’t get us started on our new shopping center where everyone provides at least one update a day as to the progress. I think that our citizen’s interest in small-town life is pretty remarkable when you realize that Titusville is the gateway to space, and we have grown up watching rockets and space shuttles blast off and return from outer space. Our parents and grandparents were the generation that made those things happen, and Titusville, through it all, has remained small and neighborly.

My life has consisted of work as a court clerk, a legal secretary/paralegal, a church secretary, and various other jobs, including a stint in a mental hospital—working there, not voluntarily or involuntarily committed. However, at no time since my memory formed can I remember wanting to be anything but an author. School aptitude tests always indicated that I would be either a great librarian or an author. That should have been enough to lock me away, I think. However, every job I have ever undertaken proved good experience for my writing career.

What genre are your books? What draws you to this genre?

Fay: I’ve never adhered to the admonition that writing in more than one genre can be fatal to a career. I do mainly write romance and romantic suspense, yet I do have a couple contemporary fiction novels I’d love to see published one day.

So, what draws me to the genre? True confession: when I first started out writing, you would never have gotten an admission out of me that I wrote romance. No, ma’am, not me. I wrote women’s fiction—oh wait—they told me women’s fiction doesn’t do well in the market. Therefore, I declared myself a writer of contemporary fiction so that someone might find an interest in it. Well, when I finished my first contemporary fiction novel, and edited it and edited it and edited it, one truth became blaringly honest. Anything without romance, no matter how much of a role it plays in a story, is boring. Since that truth struck me upside the head, I have never shied away from admitting I write romance.

So, if you’re trying to think this one out, I have an example for you. It’s a movie I love to loathe. I’ve never had any interest in the story. The mention of any of the sequels cause my eyes to roll back in my head, but my husband loves it, and sometimes I suffer my way through it with him. Think about Rocky’s story. If it had only been about boxing, if he hadn’t fallen in love with Adrienne, would the movie still be the same? Why did Rocky go the distance—what moved him forward? Without romance, the movie ended with him going down and not getting up. In my version of the thing, Rocky would have beaten the crap out of Apollo Creed and gotten the title, hugged Adrienne, lived happily ever after, and there would have been no need for any sequels. Romance, for better for worse, is the reason that movie works and for those **rolling eyes** sequels.

Do you work to an outline or prefer to see where an idea takes you?

Fay: I do prefer to see where an idea takes me. With my novel, Hope, when my publisher gave me my deadline for the release date, I was pleasantly surprised to see that Hope and her hero, Danny, had taken me almost to the very end of the book.
In my current work-in-progress Frozen Notes, I found I’d already written 70,000+ words when I was told of the due date for an autumn release. The difference between Hope and Frozen Notes is that the 70,000+ words need a quite a bit of revision. That can be the hard part about letting your ideas take you where they want to go, but I will admit, that the plot of Frozen Notes holds together. The tweaking I plan to do, though, will make it a much stronger book, conflict-wise.

What is the hardest thing about writing?

Fay: I honestly believe that I answer this question in a different way each time it is asked simply because life is constantly changing for us or for those around us that depend upon us.

Currently, what I find the most difficult is sitting at my chair and keeping my bottom firmly placed. This isn’t because of my desire to get up and down and do other things, but at this time in my life, I am dealing with someone with Alzheimer’s, and that person is living in her own story world and pulling those of us who care for her into it with her daily. Therefore, bottom firmly in chair for me for more than thirty minutes at a time is a luxury.

But if you look at my answer to Question 3, you’ll find that God was never surprised by what would be happening in the life of my loved one or how it would affect my life. He’s actually made a way that thirty minutes at a time works for me right now, and I am grateful for that because, though I long for all the time in the world to write, the quenching of that longing will come at a great price, and I’m just not ready to pay that yet.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

Fay: Alive and writing, if the Lord so wills.

Thanks for dropping by, Fay!


Hope

Hope Astor is literally a starving artist, living off the good graces of her friends as she seeks help for the fatigue that has plagued her for over a month. Dr. Daniel Duvall is a noted oncological surgeon whose life hasn’t been the same since losing his sister in a car accident the year before.

When Hope receives her diagnosis, she understands that her carefree artist’s lifestyle has left her without any options to save her life, but her friends try to convince her otherwise. They persuade Hope to seek treatment from the best doctor she knows. Trouble is, Hope is the reason Daniel’s sister is dead, and she doesn’t think saving her life is on his list of priorities.


Fay Lamb writes emotionally charged stories that remind the reader that God is always in the details. Three of the four books in the Amazing Grace romantic suspense series, are available: Stalking Willow, Better than Revenge, and Everybody’s Broken. Hope is the third book in The Ties that Bind Series, which also includes Charisse and Libby. Fay’s adventurous spirit has also taken her into the realm of non-fiction with The Art of Characterization: How to Use the Elements of Storytelling to Connect Readers to an Unforgettable Cast.

Future releases from Fay will be: Frozen Notes, Book 4 of the Amazing Grace series, and Delilah, Book 4 from The Ties that Bind.

Fay loves to meet readers, and you can find her on her personal Facebook page, her Facebook Author page, and at The Tactical Editor on Facebook and on Goodreads. She’s also active on Twitter. Then there are her blogs: On the Ledge, Inner Source, and the Tactical Editor.

7 thoughts on “Hope by Fay Lamb

  1. Hi, Fay and Jennifer!

    Fay, I enjoyed your interviewing and getting to know a little more about you. You have had a very interesting and varied life!

    Jennifer, thanks for spotlighting Fay. The questions you asked her were interesting.

    Hope you both have a great week!

    Blessings~

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