Running With the Horses

By Jennifer Hallmark

Jeremiah.

The Weeping prophet.

A man commanded by God not to marry or have children. Scorned by many because of his message of doom he continually cried out to the people of Israel.

A man on a mission.

Why do I consider Jeremiah my favorite book in the Bible? His genuineness and honesty. I see a man who was real and obeyed God. Jeremiah showed compassion toward his homeland, Israel, and yet wasn’t afraid to address the rulers, priests, and false prophets who had led the people into idolatry. He was called as a youth and admitted trying to avoid the call but couldn’t.

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you; before you were born I sanctified you; I ordained you a prophet to the nations. Then said I: ‘Ah, Lord God! Behold, I cannot speak, for I am a youth.'” Jeremiah 1: 5 NKJV

“Then I said, ‘I will not make mention of Him, nor speak anymore in His name.’
But His word was in my heart like a burning fire shut up in my bones; I was weary of holding it back, and I could not.'” Jeremiah 20:9 NKJV

As a writer, Jeremiah’s words are beautiful, full of melancholy, yet memorable. He uses repetition and symbolism throughout the book, along with poetry. He thinks and feels deeply.

My love of this book increased after reading Eugene H. Peterson’s book, Run with the Horses: The Quest for Life at its Best. This study parallels the book of Jeremiah to our lives today. Here’s a little more about it…

In Jeremiah 12:5, God says to the prophet, “If you have raced with men on foot and they have worn you out, how can you compete with horses? If you stumble in safe country, how will you manage in the thickets by the Jordan?” 

We all long to live life at its best–to take freedom and spontaneity with purpose and meaning. Why then do we often find our lives so humdrum, so unadventuresome, so routine? Or else so frantic, so full of activity, but still devoid of fulfillment? How do we learn to risk, to trust, to pursue wholeness and excellence–to run with the horses in the jungle of life?

In a series of profound reflections on the life of Jeremiah the prophet, Eugene Peterson explores the heart of what it means to be fully and genuinely human. His writing is full of humor and self-reflection, insight and wisdom, helping to set a course for others in the quest for life at its best.

As a rule, I’m cautious and reserved but I read this book at a time when I was newer to writing and it helped me move forward when I wasn’t sure I could.

This year, I’ve been reading through the Old Testament and in August I came to Jeremiah. I’m reminded again why I love this beautifully written, hauntingly sad reflection penned in a day and time when false peace covered the land.

A time much like today.

Who among us will cry out against injustice today?

Who is willing to run with the horses?

Click to tweet: Why do I consider Jeremiah my favorite book in the Bible? #BibleStudy #amwriting

Writing prompt: Leila stopped. Once again the neighbor across the street had pulled up her sign proclaiming God is Love. What was his problem? This was her yard. She…

6 thoughts on “Running With the Horses

  1. Leila stopped. Once again the neighbor across the street had pulled up her sign proclaiming God is Love. What was his problem? This was her yard. She…
    … thought about sticking it in his yard. That would show him. But she sighed, and pounded it deep in the soil in her own yard—again—she decided on a new course of action.
    An hour later, she rang his doorbell, a plate of freshly baked, warm and gooey cookies in her hand.

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