What’s in Your Media Kit?

by Tracy Ruckman

One of the first tasks authors should tackle when their first book is scheduled for release is build a media kit. This task applies to both traditionally published and self-published authors. Assembling the kit before the book is released will save hours and frustration later and having a media kit could provide you with more opportunities for outreach.

Purpose of a Media Kit

The main purpose of the media kit is convenience – you want to make it easy for anyone wanting to promote or interview you about your book to get information quickly. Before the internet, media kits were physical packets assembled and mailed out to publicists and editors of newspapers and magazines. Today, the media kit is usually a dedicated page on your website where publicists, editors, bloggers, media outlets, and others can grab your information instantly.

You can provide the information two ways (and providing it both ways is a huge plus): as individual elements that can be downloaded or copied/pasted by whoever needs it; and as a single downloadable pdf. The pdf would include all the elements listed below.

What to Include in Your Media Kit

  • Headshots – provide two to four different types of headshots, with various poses from casual to formal and in different color clothing. Use professional quality shots and provide them in high resolution formats, in jpeg format. The variety will allow each outlet to decide which image best fits for their readers and their format, and the high resolution will give them the best quality so they can make the photo any size they need. (If you provide a low resolution image, your picture will be grainy and pixelated, so it might not get used.)
  • Book cover image – provide the front cover image of your book, also with high resolution.
  • Back cover blurb
  • Your bios – Please provide two bios, one long and one short, and identify them as such. The short bio should be around 100 words, the long bio 200-250 words. Write them in 3rd person. Some markets may allow or want longer bios, while others can only use the short ones.
  • Press releases – Press releases are optional, but they’re handy to have on hand. If you don’t know how to write one, you’ll need to learn. Press releases follow a specific format and layout, so if you make them available in your media kit, you’ll need to do it correctly.
  • List of links to your website/blog, links to your book, links to your top social media pages
  • Media – If you are a speaker or teacher, or if you’ve already conducted some radio interviews or podcasts, include video and/or audio clips of some of those in your media kit. These samples will let media see and hear your personality to know how you’ll best fit their own programs.
  • List of Topics/Themes – Including a list of speaking topics and/or themes in your book serves different purposes. The list provides media with talking points, especially as they are relevant in today’s headlines, while also providing event organizers ideas for how to use you in their programs. The list also serves as keywords for SEO purposes, so your website/blog can be found under searches for those themes, which could bring you new readers or opportunities.
  • Events – If you already have experience as a speaker or workshop presenter, list those events with dates, locations, topics presented.

Safety

In today’s world, we must take safety precautions, and this includes within your media kit. Press releases must contain contact information but use caution in sharing your home address or phone number. I always recommend that my clients leave out both of those in their online kits, but be sure to provide other options, like a business e-mail address (or two) and social media contacts. If you have a dedicated phone line for your business that’s listed publicly, you may list it, but remember that the information in your media kit will now be accessible by anyone worldwide.

Media kits are great marketing tools. Review your media kit once or twice a year, adding updates and deleting older information. Remember to keep it professional and put your best self in the spotlight.


One of the best ways to learn is to look at what others are doing. Here are a few excellent media kits I found online:

Lori Roeleveld: https://loriroeleveld.com/press/
Elizabeth Noyes: http://elizabethnoyeswrites.com/media-kit/
Rachel Hauck: http://www.rachelhauck.com/media/
Edie Melson: http://ediemelson.com/media/
Matt Patterson: http://matt-patterson.com/mediakit

Writing Prompt: Choose one of the bulleted items above and create it as a promotional tool for your latest release.

Click to Tweet: A #media kit makes it easy for anyone wanting to #promote or interview you about your book to get information quickly. What’s in Your Media Kit @TracyRuckman @InspiredPrompt


Tracy Ruckman is an entrepreneur, writer, and photographer. As a book publisher, she’s published over 100 books, and is current publisher at TMP Books. She logs her journey as artist, writer, and screenwriter at The Thriving Artist on Patreon, and interviews artists and entrepreneurs on her Tracy Ruckman blog. Her artwork is available in her Zazzle store.

6 thoughts on “What’s in Your Media Kit?

  1. Tracy, this is such an important post! I had no idea what a media kit was or that I needed one until after I signed with my publisher. Then when I started searching online to figure out how to put a media kit together, I ran across some variety (sometimes conflicting opinions), so it was a little frustrating. This is a great post…especially with the examples you included. Thanks!

  2. Pingback: April 2017 Around the Web |

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