3 Questions Wednesday with Sandra Ardoin

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday!

This week’s guest is an award-winning historical romance author Sandra Ardoin, Welcome to the Inspired Prompt blog, Sandra.

First question—Who is your favorite author?

Sandra: Like so many other favorites in life, my “always-read” authors change from time to time. In fact, I’ve had numerous favorites over the years. At this moment, though, I’d say it’s Elizabeth Camden. I’ve read ALL of her books. I really enjoy how she incorporates interesting professions, particularly for women, and provides so much historical information about those professions within an intriguing story.

Nice choice.  Now, second question

If you could write about anyone or anything fiction/nonfiction who or what would you write about?

Sandra: While I write historical romance (with a bit of mystery/suspense/adventure) and love it, I’d like to try my hand at a contemporary romantic suspense. It’s a genre I enjoy reading. In fact, I enjoy any story with mystery or suspense. Actually, I have started one, but the historical romance continues to call me back. I believe in God’s timing and leading, so…clock-3179167__340

Timing is everything 😉 That brings us to question number three—

If you could spend time with a character from your book or another book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day?

Sandra:  I’d pal around with Hallie Russell Preston, the heroine in my new novella A Love Most Worthy. She loves adventure. I think we’d borrow Bill Zeller’s rocker to find gold nuggets on the beach at Nome, Alaska. Bill and his wife are friends of Hallie’s with a tent on the beach where they live as they search for their fortune in gold. We might drag along Amelia Peabody, the archeologist from Elizabeth Peters’ books. Um… Come to think of it, she’d probably drag us along!

Sounds like an adventurous day! Thank you so much for stopping by!

Click to Tweet: 3 Questions Wednesday’s guest is author Sandra Ardoin,  Learn more about her and her book about a mail-order bride and leave a comment for a chance to win an e-book via @InspiredPrompt. #SandraArdoin 

Please leave a comment for your chance to win an e-book version of A Love Most Worthy.


A Love Most Worthy

almw - ardoinShe didn’t know which was colder,

           an Arctic winter or her new husband’s heart.

Hallie Russell believes life should be lived to the fullest. For that reason, she sails to the gold rush town of Nome, Alaska to take her cousin’s place as the mail-order bride of a respected shopkeeper. But when her aloof husband’s wedding-night announcement rocks her plans for their marriage, Hallie sees her desire for a family to call her own vanish as quickly as the dreams of hopeful miners.

Tragedy led Rance Preston to repent of his rowdy ways and open a general store for the miners in Nome. He’s content in his bachelorhood, but his two orphaned nephews deserve a proper and serious-minded mother. Duped once by a vivacious female, he’s determined to never again let his heart overrule his head…until the high spirits of his new bride threaten his resolve.

When a misunderstanding comes to light, will they allow the gale force winds of insecurity to destroy what they each need most?


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Sandra Ardoin

As an author of heartwarming and award-winning historical romance, Sandra Ardoin engages readers with page-turning stories of love and faith. Rarely out of reach of a book, she’s also an armchair sports enthusiast, country music listener, and seldom says no to eating out.

Visit her on her website. Connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Pinterest, and BookBub. Become a member of the Love and Faith in Fiction community and discover what’s upcoming, and learn of specials and giveaways. 

Pre-order A Love Most Worthy on Amazon

Time to Write with Karen Sargent

Are You Trapped in Your Writing World?

By Karen Sargent

Writing had consumed every aspect of my life. When I wasn’t teaching English during the day or sleeping at night, I was sitting at my desk, logged into my laptop—and logged out of my life. But what choice did I have? I was a new author chasing the dream, and the dream takes hustle. I love the dream. I love to write. But I hated what it was doing to me.

I had many masters, and I tried to serve them all: Facebook groups, writing blogs, reading blogs, my own blog, Twitter, book launch teams, agents to beg, a publisher to please, a platform to build, a book to market, ARCs to read, reviews to post, endorsements to write, contests to judge, writing friends to promote, reading friends to meet, workshops to present, new writers to mentor, a work-in-progress…

And the list of so many good things goes on. But, oh the craziness!

I had what my youngest daughter diagnosed as FOMO—fear of missing out. I was afraid to miss the next Tweet or the next article or the next professional connection that would move me one step farther down “the write road.” I feared missing out on the one magic thing I should be doing—whatever it was—and was in constant search of it.  

The pressures of being a debut author had skewed my perspective. For most of 2016 and 2017, I was so busy trying to write, publish, and promote a story, I missed out on too much of my own story. If a friend asked to meet at the coffee shop, I’d calculate how much writing time it would cost me. If I watched a movie with my family, the plot I was most interested in was the one I was writing in my head.

Living my life was like reading a book by skimming the chapters, or sometimes just the opening and closing paragraphs, or maybe skipping a chapter entirely. You get the gist of the story, but you don’t fully experience it. That was me.

Until life pounded at my door.  Correction: It busted through like a SWAT team and refused to be neglected anymore.  

I was in the midst of my debut’s first year, still deep into building relationships, trying to find my place in the writing community and my way into readers’ hands. And then my mom’s health started a rapid decline. The doctor recommended hospice, and she wished to spend her last days at home, so I wrote sub plans, cashed in my sick days, and moved in for a few months.

From a writing standpoint, the first two weeks were the hardest. I had little time to engage on social media or to read and comment on blogs. I missed my writing friends, and I truly think I suffered withdrawal symptoms. I had to break promises to promote book releases and cancel workshops I had committed to teach. I struggled to fulfill my volunteer role in a writing organization, and I couldn’t post on my blog. Nothing was more important than the privilege of caring for my mom, but I feared how quickly I would lose the relationships I cherished and the connections I had worked so hard to make.

But soon, my real life came back into focus.

I rediscovered the person I once was who had become lost in the writer I wanted to be. Becoming reacquainted with myself allowed me to fully engage in the joy and grief of caring for my mom until she passed in June. In that time, my oldest daughter graduated from college, moved out, and started her career. The rest of summer passed, a new school year began, and I was busy preparing for my daughter’s November wedding. The holiday season followed, and now here I am, looking back at 2018. I can’t say I was much of a writer last year, but I’m proud to say I was a devoted daughter and an involved wife, mother, and friend.

And here’s the amazing part. My writing community didn’t forget me. Before the end of 2018, I was invited to participate in author events, teach workshops, and guest post. My book sales had a little boost in time for Christmas, and occasionally a reader will ask when my next book will be out. I’m on faculty for the 2019 Missouri Writers Guild Conference, and I’ve booked my first out-of-state speaking engagement at a fundraiser for a children’s hospital. The astounding thing is I solicited none of these invitations. In spite of my fear of missing out, my writing community opened their arms wide and said, “Welcome back.” My heart is so full!

The past ten months replaced my FOMO with JOMO—the joy of missing out. I remembered how to enjoy life away from my laptop. Now, as I turn my daughter’s old bedroom into my new office, I better understand how to balance the two worlds that are so important to me. I’ve evaluated how I spend my time in the writing world. I’ve identified where I find authentic relationships, important information, valuable partnerships, and personal progress. That’s where you’ll find me. Everything else is clutter. I’ve set writing goals—and writing limits. When it’s time for me to be a writer, I’ll fully be a writer…guilt free. And when it’s time for me to be a wife, a mom, or a friend, I’ll fully be that as well…frustration free.

In 2019, I’m going to spend less time writing more, and more time living well.

[Click to Tweet] I rediscovered the person I once was who had become lost in the writer I wanted to be. Time to Write with Karen Sargent via @InspiredPrompt #amwriting #writerslife

Writing Prompt: FOMO produces clutter. Clutter steals precious writing time, family time, and energy. Make a list of clutter in your writing life. What can be eliminated to make room for more productivity and joy in both of your worlds?


Karen Sargent is a recovering writing-aholic who does not miss the burning shoulder, lower backache, and 15 pounds that disappeared in 2018 when she ended a long-term relationship with her laptop. Armed with a new 2019 planner, she has scheduled joy back into her life, sprinkled with a moderate dose of writing her WIP, a little bit of blogging, and an occasional workshop presentation. Karen’s debut novel, Waiting for Butterflies, was named the 2017 IAN Book of the Year and received the Foreword Reviews Gold for Christian fiction. Visit her at KarenSargentBooks.com.

Time to Write with Tammy & Lisa Mayer

Tammy Trail wrote her first story in sixth grade. It won a prize and she was hooked. After life slowed down a bit, she began to dabble with writing a full-fledged novel. A contributor to Inspired Prompts since 2014, the learning still continues.

So, how does she make time to write?

Working a full-time job left me little time to write. Then my hours changed. I now work a mid-shift from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. There’s very little time before I need to get out the door.

After work, there is dinner, household chores, and sometimes Grandma time with my two grandsons. It’s a dilemma that I have yet to overcome.

This next year will be different. I usually never set resolutions for the new year. However, I do set goals. My BIG goal for next year is to go to bed early in order to get up earlier to exercise and write. This will be a huge struggle for me, but I am determined!

Prayers for your efforts, Tammy. May 2019 be the year of your break through!


Lisa R. Mayer has anxiety and OCD and is a proud mental health warrior. In her free time, she enjoys hanging out with her husband, Rich, and her fur-baby, Scooby, catching up on her reading list, watching her favorite shows and movies, bike-riding, traveling, and going on adventures. You can learn more at www.lisarmayer.com, or follow her on Twitter @LisaRMayer2019, Instagram at author_lisa_r_mayer_2019, or on Facebook at Author-Lisa R Mayer.


Like many of you, when I look back on my life… I realize I’ve always been a writer. If I don’t write, it’s like part of me is missing. But it’s more than that. I would dare argue that making time for writing is akin to making time to becoming a better person.

Writing, just like being a better person, involves editing. We work to be a better person by editing our thoughts and actions, chipping away as a sculptor would marble until we find the best version of ourselves underneath. And we edit our writing in the same way until we find the story—our story—that is bursting out of our hearts.

All of us know why we write… because our story must be told. Not only the story of our characters, but the story of our lives, the things we’ve been through and learned. We pour a little bit of ourselves into our characters and hope that their best parts will become part of us, too. We hope that we’ll make the right decisions. We hope our books will touch lives.

I’ve learned the importance of editing as both a person and writer. I edit through my foot-in-mouth moments when all I can do is apologize. I edit when I was told the first chapters of my book were boring. I edit when I need to focus on my mental health. And I edit even when it means tearing my book apart for what feels like the hundredth time. In real life and writing… editing is hope that things can and will get better. We just can’t give up.

And that is why I never stop writing. But I also never stop editing.

Click to Tweet: All of us know why we write… because our story must be told. Not only the story of our characters, but the story of our lives, the things we’ve been through and learned. Lisa R. Mayer via @InspiredPrompt #amwriting #amediting #WritersLife

Writing Prompt: Imagine your best day. Write about it: where are you, and what are you doing? (Keep it G-rated, please!)

3 Questions Wednesday with Carol McClain

87489044f054Good morning! It is my pleasure to welcome back author Carol McClain to the Inspired Prompt.

Good morning, Carol.

Who is your favorite author?

Carol:  We have so many great authors to choose from. For years, I loved Annie Dillard. Her way with words and her thought process and sass always keep me thinking. I’ve reread Pilgrim at Tinker Creek too many times to count. With each reading, I uncover more wonder.

Dillard’s always my first thought when it comes to authors. Recently, though, in the realm of fiction, I’ve fallen in love with Lisa Wingate and Susan Meissner. Both authors think differently than most CBA authors. They don’t seem to lean to the obvious. Never am I afraid to pick up one of their books—so much so, that I don’t put a lot of thought into it. If I find a secondhand book or on a bookstore shelf, I nab it.

Great choices 🙂

If you could write about anyone or anything fiction/nonfiction who or
what would you write about?

Carol:  Currently, I’m obsessed with goats. I love their personalities. We live on two acres in the country, and if my husband was willing to help me, (or willing to own them), I’d have goats. I, at one time, owned a Nubian named Heidi. Such a sweet animal.

Since goats are not on my horizon, my new protagonist owns eight of them. She creates soap and yogurt from their milk. I’m learning soap making (I already know how to milk) and having a ball living through Meredith’s world. Her mother shears Meredith’s angora goats (she owns angora and Nubian), and creates fabric from it.

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Goats are so funny to watch! They do have the best personalities.

If you could spend time with a character from your book or another book
whom would it be? And what would you do during that day? 

Carol:  Although Adam allowed the past to poison his true nature, I love Adam’s vocation. He’s a paramedic. When researching his occupation, I got to attend training sessions with the local EMTs. My critique partner, Randy Cook, was a paramedic at one time. I love the idea of saving people’s lives. I’m obsessed with medical shows (and weirdly—I love the autopsy scenes the most). Adam has a heart for the hurting, when he discovers his nemesis needs help, despite his disdain, he finds a solution to her problem. His love, his skill and his compassion make me want to be like him.

 He sounds like a wonderful character. We’re so glad you dropped by, Carol.

Click to tweet: Author Carol Mcclain talks about her favorite character and you have a chance to win a giveaway. #giveaway #CarolMcclain

Readers, Carol will give away a kindle or nook copy of Yesterday’s Poison. Let her know by commenting below your favorite author or if you could spend time with anyone, who and why? 


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Yesterday’s Poison

After her boyfriend betrays her, Torie Sullivan careens into a ditch in a drunken fury. Paramedic Adam Benedict rescues the unconscious woman, then realizes she’s one of the middle school bullies who tormented him twelve years ago. The encounter rips open scars he thought had healed.

While kayaking one morning, Adam discovers Torie bathing in the frigid waters of Hookskill Preserve. He then learns she’s living in a lean-to in the forested preserve. Despite his hatred for her, Adam’s innate compassion won’t allow him to leave Torie in the wilds of Albany County. He offers her a secure, private room in his minuscule cabin.

When tragedy strikes Adam’s family, his girlfriend Maya Vitale gives Torie a room in her apartment. Torie envies Maya’s idyllic life, unaware she, too, hides a dark and shameful past.

Each character drinks yesterday’s poison. Their friendships intertwine their lives and expose their toxic pasts. They must learn to forgive the unpardonable.


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Author Carol McClain is an eclectic artist and author of three books. Her interests vary as much at the Tennessee weather—running, bassoons, jazz, stained glass and, of course, writing. She’s a transplant from New York who now lives in the hills of East Tennessee with her husband and overactive Springer spaniel.

She is the president of ACFW Knoxville and the secretary of the Authors’ Guild of Tennessee. Currently, she serves as course coordinator for the ACFW loop.

In her “free time” she teaches life skills in the local jail and supervises student teachers for WGU.

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Time to Write with Lisa & Gail

Lisa Worthey Smith is a long time Bible teacher who ventured into writing inspirational stories a few years ago, and is now President of Word Weavers North Alabama.

She and her husband are empty nesting in northern Alabama where she spends time in her garden and writes stories of Faith*Hope*Love. Her first two books Oscar the Extraordinary Hummingbird and The Wisdom Tree are available on Amazon.com and she expects to release two books in 2019, Ground Kisser and COFFEE with God at Christmas.


Social media, daily chores, ideas for different stories, unexpected family needs all creep in and steal time that could have been used to crank out more words for the project of the moment. So, how do I manage my writing time?

Pray.

I ask God to give me direction for the day, deferring to His will rather than mine. If I get behind on my writing goals for the day because I spent time with someone who needed encouragement, I don’t count that as a lost day. I never want to be so headstrong on my goals, that I neglect His prompting.

Plan.

I work best with a plan to reach certain goals. I keep a small calendar on my desk to log in my deadlines and use that as a starting point.

Pare it down.

If I need to produce a 40,000 word story, I break that down into monthly, weekly and daily bites so I am not overwhelmed with a 5,000 word deficit a week before my deadline. There is great satisfaction in turning a page on the calendar, knowing those tasks are accomplished without panicking at the bigger picture of what is still before me.

Prioritize my time.

Work comes before leisure, so mornings are dedicated to writing. If something comes up, I still have time later in the day to reach my goal. If I have to give up something, I’ll give up leisure time to accomplish my goals and not deal with the stress of being behind.

Persist.

Of course, there are days when my computer remains unopened. Still, tomorrow I renew my prayer to follow His will, and adjust my goals to match His, and persist. The only thing stopping us from reaching our dreams is to give up. Persist instead.


From Gail Johnson—So, you’ve read the latest on carving out time for writing, but no matter how hard you try, the bullet list doesn’t seem to be working as promised. Oh, what’s a writer to do?

The best thing that you will ever do for your peace of mind is realize that writing isn’t a one size fits all profession. It’s a personal journey for each author. For me, it’s trusting myself, and God, to know what is best. I can’t sit in a chair and stare at a blank screen. It would be easier to lay an egg than writing my rough draft this way.

My goal each day isn’t so much about getting a set number of typed words on paper but staying in my head and listening to my characters. I can do this anytime and anywhere I’m able to pen words to paper, napkin, or shoe sole. 😊

When driving, I dictate to my sweet daughter who is glad to help in my time of need. My entire rough draft is hand-written conversations between my characters. That’s it. No settings. No internal thoughts. Just conversations. They reveal the plot. When I feel I have the gist of the scene, I sit and write the chapters adding the necessary components.

Remember, this is my process. It may not be your cup of tea. Learn what’s best for you. Trust your quirkiness; it’s what makes you, you. Finding your own process will make the words flow like warm honey across hot biscuits.


Gail Johnson enjoys sharing her passion for life and Christ through the power of the written word. Whether it’s through stories, articles, or songs, she invites her reader and listener to “taste and see” the hope she has found in a faithful God and loving Savior.

She is the author of Treasures of Hope, Discovering the Beautiful Truth Beneath My Painful Past, a memoir. A member of American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), she writes fiction, non-fiction, and songs. Her Southern Gospel song “Less of Me and More of You” came in the top 5 runners-up in the 2010 Singing News/Solid Gospel Songwriters Search. Born and raised in Georgia, she is a wife and mother of two adult children. She enjoys lots of family time, good music, maple pecan ice cream, and southern living. In the past, she has published articles and interviews on the web, in the local newspaper, and in church magazines.


Click to Tweet: My goal each day isn’t so much about getting a set number of typed words on paper but staying in my head and listening to my characters.  Via @InspiredPrompt from @GailJohnson87 #amwriting #inspiration

Writing Prompt: It’s morning, the sun is shining. You open the curtains to find something you never expected to see in your front yard. Using NO adverbs or adjectives, describe what you see.