Blog Tours

by Harriet Michael

Sounds exciting, right? But what exactly are blog tours and how are they helpful to a writer?

What is a blog tour?

A blog tour is a collection of blogs that agree to write a post about you or information (often about your new book.) This usually happens in a set amount of time, like a week or two with each blog appearance scheduled for a different day. Ideally, you or your new book will be the focus of a blog post every day or every few days for 10-14 days. Often, bloggers willing to participate in blog tours agree to read your book and also post a review on Amazon, Goodreads, Barnes and Noble, or some other site.

How is a blog tour beneficial?

The main benefit of a blog tour is online exposure, though a secondary benefit is attaining those much desired, hard to come by reviews of your book. The effect of blog tours on book sales is minimal but to me, the reviews are worth their weight in gold. Blog tours are often utilized as part of a book launch when an author has a new book, but older books can also benefit from tours.

Arranging a Blog Tour

So, this all sounds interesting, how do you get your book into a tour? There are many options available. If you do an internet search you may find organized tours that you can participate in. Or you might want to arrange a tour of your own by asking blogger friends if they would be willing to spotlight your book. Organized tours usually cost to participate in and I strongly suggest if you arrange your own blog tour that you offer some gift of gratitude to your blogger friends who agree to spotlight you—at the very least a free e-book copy to the blogger. This makes it easier for her to also review your book.

My Experience

I have participated in blog tours through Celebrate Lit. They are an organized tour where bloggers agree to participate. Fellow Inspired Prompt contributor, Shirley Crowder is a participating blogger with Celebrate Lit. I enjoyed my blog tour experience. The exposure was nice and the Amazon, Goodreads, and Barnes and Noble reviews priceless! It did have a cost, though. My publisher was able to get a discounted price and I was able to split the cost because my book had a co-writer. Given all of that, I felt it was well worth it but if I’d had to bear the whole cost myself, I probably would have tried to arrange my own blog tour rather than go the organized route.

Writing Prompt: Write a brief (1-2 paragraph) summary of a book you would like to have spotlighted on a blog tour.

Click-to-Tweet: The main benefit of a blog tour is online exposure, though a secondary benefit is attaining those much desired, hard to come by reviews of your book.

Easy Peasy Cooking

I have a friend who never does anything the easy way when it comes to cooking. She even took a French cooking class and makes some of the most delicious food I’ve ever sunk my teeth into. She would never just open a can of this or a packet of that when preparing her meals.

That woman is not me. She is a close friend of mine, but she is definitely not me!

I’m all in there for opening a can of this or a packet of that, pouring it over some kind of meat, and forgetting about it until dinner time. Today I will share with you two of my favorite easy-peasy dishes.

ruth-reyer-1140149-unsplash

Crock-pot Roast Beef

  • Put roast beef in the bottom of a crock-pot. (I use whatever cut of roast beef I find on sale, whether its rump roast, round roast, sirloin, or whatever else my local grocery store may have on sale.)
  • Place ½-1 stick of butter over the meat along with parts of packets of Au jus and a packet of dry ranch dressing.
  • Add vegetables: carrots, potatoes, celery, and onion
  • Sprinkle the rest of contents of the two packets over the veggies and cook according to the crockpot directions (4 hours if on high, 8 hrs if on low.)

*I got this recipe from my daughter-in-law who fixed it for my husband and me when we visited. It was so yummy, that I had to have her recipe.

Easy Barbeque Chicken

  • Put cut up chicken pieces in a casserole dish. Personally, I like chicken breasts, but any cut of chicken would work
  • Sprinkle a dry packet of beefy onion soup over the chicken.
  • Put a can of cranberry sauce over the chicken. I use the cranberry sauce with whole cranberries. This doesn’t pour. You have to spoon it out and sort of spread it over the chicken.
  • Pour about a half cup of California French dressing over this and mix together with the cranberry sauce to the extent you can.
  • Bake at 350 degrees for about an hour. Pull the dish out about midway and baste the meat with the sauce around it.
  • Serve over rice.

*This is one of my youngest son’s favorite meals.

I’m all in there for opening a can of this or a packet of that, pouring it over some kind of meat, and forgetting about it until dinner time. — You can Tweet that!

Writing Prompt: If we open the lid of the crock pot in your kitchen, what do we find?

Writing for Chicken Soup for the Soul

By Harriet Michael

Chicken Soup for the Soul publishes around a dozen books a year, each with 101 stories in it. That’s approximately 1,200 chances to have a story you wrote published per year. Sounds pretty great, right? It is and it isn’t. It is not as easy as it may seem to have your story selected for one of their titles. But if/when that happens, then yes, it’s pretty great!

This year’s Christmas themed book titled, It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas, will have a story in it written by me.

Chicken Soup Christmas book

This is the fourth story I have had selected for Chicken Soup. While that’s exciting and an honor, I must share an insight that I have in their selection process. This is just my opinion and others may disagree with me, but it seems to me that it is harder to have your first story chosen by them than subsequent stories. At least that is my experience.

I am a prolific freelance writer. I have submitted many, many short pieces (articles, devotions, short stories) to many different publications since I began sending submissions in 2009. After over ten years of freelance writing, I have had a lot of acceptances but also a lot of rejections. However, my rejection percentage with Chicken Soup for the Soul was 100% for the first few years. That was definitely not the norm for me with other publications. I sent several stories a year and never received even a notice that it was being considered for one of their books. Finally, in 2014, after about four years of rejections, I got an e-mail telling me one of my stories had made it to the final round of selection. I danced with joy when I read that email!

Since then I have had four stories selected. This experience has made me conclude that it is harder to get a first story chosen but slightly easier after that. My experience may only be coincidental, but it prompts me to encourage writers to keep sending Chicken Soup stories. Keep on keeping on!

Chicken Soup publishes inspirational true stories from ordinary people. They want stories under 1200 words (with 1,000 being closer to their sweet spot) written to one of their book topics or themes. If your story is chosen, you will first get an email telling you that your story has made it to the final round. This email will include a publishing contract that will be discarded if your story is not chosen for the actual book. Most stories that reach this round make it to the book, but a few don’t. I have never had one dropped after this stage, but my sister has. Then, the fun part—you receive 10 free copies of the book about a month before its release date and a check for $200 about a month after the release date.

And because I’m a stickler about writer’s rights, I asked them when the rights would return to me. The contract states that they are buying 1st rights but does not say when the rights revert back to the author. Most of my freelance contracts contain this information. Chicken Soup replied that I owned the rights again as soon as the book releases, or one day afterward, I suppose, since 1st rights mean they have the right to be the first to publish it.

Writing for Chicken Soup is fun and rewarding. I highly recommend giving it a try and like the old saying goes, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.”

And make sure to join us in September as we tackle a fun topic: Cooking for Writers…


Writing prompt / Exercise: Go to https://www.chickensoup.com/ and click on “Submit your story” at the bottom of the page. That will take you to a site that has book titles/themes, guidelines, and the online submission form. Familiarize yourself with these and then, if inspired, write a story for one of their Book topics.

Click-to-Tweet: Chicken Soup for the Soul publishes around a dozen books a year, each with 101 stories in it. That’s approximately 1,200 chances to have a story you wrote published per year.–Harriet E. Michael via @inspiredprompt #amwriting #freelance

Writing for Magazines

By Harriet Michael

When I was a little girl, I loved fishing with my dad. We lived in Nigeria then, so we didn’t have access to many of the fun things people in America had. We didn’t even have swimming pools without traveling at least an hour’s drive from my home. But we had a man-made water reservoir where I could fish. I learned to cast my line out into murky waters, wait in anticipation to feel that tug on my line and then try and reel it in without letting the fish get away.

girls fishing

Maybe that’s why I like freelance writing. I cast pieces—articles, devotions, short stories—out into the murky waters of cyberspace and wait hopefully. Sometimes I feel that tug and sometimes I even reel in a great catch in the form of a contract for a submitted piece.

Of all the publications for which I write, magazines are among my favorite. I get to write on topics of interest to me because I choose the type of magazine I wish to submit to, they pay (some better than others) so I have a flow of cash coming in all year long, and they help build my platform because they are viewed by people I otherwise would not be able to reach.

Here are some tips for anyone hoping to break into the magazine-writing market:

  • Search engines are your best friends. You can find any magazine you think you might like to write for by searching that magazine’s name and the words, “writers’ guidelines.” Ex: “The War Cry writers’ guidelines” You can search types of magazines this way too. Ex: “parenting magazines writers’ guidelines” or “cooking magazines writers’ guidelines” Any magazine that takes freelance submissions will show up if you search by topic.
  • Read the writers’ guidelines, taking note of a few things:

a] What rights do they buy? I avoid magazines that buy all rights or exclusive rights. See the article on this blog about a writer’s rights if you do not understand this.

b] How much and when do they pay? Do they pay on acceptance of your submitted piece or when the article is published? This is merely a guide to me so I will know when to expect a payment, but both are fine.

c] What word count do they want? Stick to their requested word count to the best of your ability. Usually, it’s okay to be over or under by less than 10 words but some online submission sites will cut you off at their maximum count, so I prefer to err on the “under” side of things.

d] Do they have a theme list? Do they want a particular type of article?

  • Write and submit according to the guidelines. Follow the guidelines as closely as you can … and then wait to feel that tug on your line.

A question I often get when teaching workshops on freelancing or magazine writing, is should a person write from inspiration or according to a theme requested by the magazine.

My answer: “Both.”

Writing according to the magazines’ wishes, whether that is a theme or a type of article (like a “how-to”, essay, or story) brings greater success. If they are looking for something specific and you give them what they are looking for, they are more likely to buy it. However, there have been times when something has happened in my life that I simply wanted to write down. This happens often but sometimes these pieces sit on my computer for a long time until a theme or magazine where the piece might fit pops up.

One example of this is an article I had published in a gardening magazine last spring about a humorous experience that occurred many years ago. When it happened, my youngest son was in elementary school. I laughed about what happened all day at the time, so knew I wanted to write it before I forgot, but I had nowhere to send it. When I finally found a magazine where this piece fit, my son was in college. Still, they did take it, people enjoyed reading it, and I received a check for it, even though it was more than a dozen years from the time I wrote it to the time it was published.

Click-to-Tweet:  You’ll never catch a fish if you don’t throw a line in the water and you’ll never have an article published in a magazine if you don’t try your hand at writing and submitting one.

magazines

Writing Prompt / Exercise: Look up the writers’ guidelines for a magazine that you enjoy reading and begin writing an article for submission to that magazine. *Hint: Christian magazines get fewer submissions than secular ones, so the chances of getting published in them are higher.

Gardening!

I have been a gardener for as long as I can remember … or at least attempted to be one. As a child, there was an open lot next to our house in Nigeria which my dad made into a large garden. He and Mom worked tirelessly in that garden along with the help of a hired Nigerian worker. The produce they grew during the rainy season helped so much at that place and time in history, when getting food was not as simple a task as stopping by the grocery store on my way home, like it is now.

And I helped them garden. At least I toddled along behind Daddy and pestered him, asking how I could help him. I was the only one of his four children who showed an interest in gardening and I have been drawn to it for as long as I can remember.

One of my fondest gardening memories is of climbing inside the angled cucumber trellis my dad had built, to pick ripe cucumbers inside that he could not see or reach. He’d built a long teepee-like structure with the two sides about three feet apart at the base but meeting in the middle a few feet off the ground. I would crawl along inside that structure picking cucumbers and tossing them out to him. I felt like I was in my own little botanical wonderland with lush vines all around me. And I felt so big and important to have been given the task of deciding if a cucumber was ready to be picked or not.

The first year I was married, over 40 years ago now, I talked my husband into renting a tiller and tilling up a patch of land in our back yard for me to plant vegetables. I had no idea what I was doing back then but worked away at the endeavor anyway. I have had a garden ever since but these days I at least know which plants do better in dryer soil, which need more water, which should be planted by seed and which need to be started indoors a few weeks before planting. I’ve also learned a few tricks like planting marigolds around the edge of the garden to help keep the bugs out.

Last year, I tried something new. My college-age son put in a raised garden for me and, oh my goodness, that turned out so well! I don’t know if it was that the new location got more sunlight or if it was the new bags of garden soil I put in the area, but I have never had such a successful garden. Ever. I had a couple rows of okra that grew to be taller than me by several feet. I had to bend them over to pick the new produce by the end of the season. My family ate roasted okra all summer and fried okra all winter that I had cut and frozen.

So, it’s summer again and you can bet if I can’t be found inside my house cleaning, cooking, or writing, I am outside playing in my garden.

Since I often write devotions, I naturally find Bible verses for many aspects of life. Here is my favorite gardening verse:

Sow righteousness for yourselves, reap the fruit of unfailing love, and break up your unplowed ground; for it is time to seek the LORD, until he comes and showers his righteousness on you. Hosea 10:12 (NIV)

Click to Tweet: “It’s summer again and you can bet if I can’t be found inside my house cleaning, cooking, or writing, I am outside playing in my garden.” — Harriet Michael via @InspiredPrompt #gardening #FridayThoughts

Writing Prompt –  Finish this paragraph: Ellen dumped another shovel-full of soil into the wheelbarrow. All this work better pay off. If the garden didn’t do well, Marty would throw a fit.