Journaling: A Good Practice – Part 2

bible.jpgIn Part 1, we looked at the types of things to include in your journal. Today, I want to share my biblical reasons for journaling.

The Bible is filled with passages telling us to recall or remember who God is, two of these are: This I recall to mind, therefore I have hope (Lamentations 3:21 ESV) and Remember His marvelous works which He has done, His wonders, and the judgments of His mouth. (1 Chronicles 16:11-12 ESV).

In the Old Testament, people built altars to signify and remind them of God’s work in their lives or the lives of His people. In addition to the Bible, my journal serves as a reminder of God’s work in my life and the lives of my family and friends. Numerous times throughout the year, and before stepping into a major new beginning, it is my practice to read through my journal entries.

These entries remind me of God’s faithfulness, mercy, grace, and love that has enabled me to walk through every situation I encountered.

Page after page of entries are filled with the names of new and long-time friends who have blessed my life in so many ways. Many of the entries mark the passing of a dear loved one from this life to everlasting life with the Lord. Sadly, other entries mark the passing of a dear loved one whom I am not certain knew the Lord as his or her Savior. Those entries always serve as an impetus to be more faithful in sharing the Gospel with people. While reading these entries is sobering in so many ways, they always remind and encourage me of how the Lord answered my prayers and how He provided for my every need—often before I even knew I had the need!

From time-to-time, I come across tear-stained pages with words that express my sadness, loneliness, hurt, brokenness, or depression. These entries also express the cries of my heart for the Lord to give me a passion to know Him, a heart to serve Him, and eyes of love to view people.

By far, the most difficult entries for me to read are those that remind me of my grievous sins of omission and commission. They reveal my selfishness, anger, failure, greed, and so many other sins. Yet, most of them have been marked with references to later entries that describe how the Lord forgave and restored me. There are, however, some entries with no such reference, which means I must stop to repent and ask the Lord to forgive me for that sin.

Each year’s journal is a continuation of the story of God’s redemption of and faithfulness to His people and to me.

God is not faithful to us because of anything we do or have done, but because of His great mercy and love for us (Ephesians 2:4).

Reading through these entries also brings to mind the parable about the faithful servant and the evil servant in Luke 12 (NKJV). This parable ends with verse 48, to whom much is given, from him much will be required. This verse reminds us that God will hold us accountable to use the gifts, talents, abilities, experiences, knowledge, and understanding He has given us.

Some entries remind me of ideas or illustrations for teaching, counseling, or writing. Other entries remind me of people I need to check on or for whom I need to continue praying.

Thankfully, you and I do not have to depend upon ourselves and our own strength to accomplish the things God sets before us, because as Christ-followers we can rely absolutely upon Him to equip and enable us to serve.

Writing Prompt: Take time to prayerfully consider the ministry opportunities, which include writing, the Lord has placed in your life, and how you can use your God-given gifts, talents, abilities, experiences, knowledge, and understanding to serve Him.

Click to Tweet: Each year’s journal is a continuation of the story of God’s redemption of and faithfulness to His people and to me. #WritingPrompts #journaling

Journaling: A Good Practice – Part 1

journaling.jpgJournals take a myriad of forms these days. For some, their social media posts are their journals. Some prefer handwriting their journal entries, others prefer to type them. I have an elderly friend who can no longer see well enough to write or type, so her grandson set her up to make voice recorded journal entries.

Journaling is a must for those who aspire to be writers—recreationally or professionally.

My dad, a Navy Corpsman attached to the 3rd Marine Division on Iwo Jima and Guam during WWII, kept a journal of names, injuries, scene descriptions, sketches of the islands, and stories that he used as a basis for a book he wrote over 40 years later.

I have kept a journal since my late teens and strongly encourage those I know to journal, particularly when they are in the midst of major changes and/or struggles. We always think we will remember the details, but we don’t. Most of the devotionals and blogs I have written are based on my journal entries.

I was encouraging one of my counselees to journal, she replied, “Journaling isn’t for me! I don’t have the patience, time, or inclination to learn how to do something new!”

I responded,

“Make your own rules! Your unique personality will shine brightly through entries that reflect the spiritual, emotional, mental, and physical aspects of your life.”

Writing Prompt: I was at the grocery story and over heard a lady say …

Following are some of the things I shared with my young friend about my current journaling practices.

Recording the following in my journal during my daily morning quiet time:

  • Prayers confessing my sin with notations of Scripture referencing an aspect of God’s character.
  • My feelings: anxiety, fear, sadness, excitement, happiness, depression, ambivalence.
  • At least three things for which I am thankful—these often surface while reading past entries that remind me of God’s mercy, grace, faithfulness, and love that has enabled me to walk through every situation.
  • Scripture I read in my quiet time. Any words or phrases that stand out to me and related passages that come to mind. Ideas for further study, teaching, counseling, and writing.
  • Prayer requests—my own and for others. Leave a little space to record how and when the request is answered.
  • Spiritual, emotional, mental and physical areas in which I need to improve.

Throughout the day as thoughts and ideas come to mind, I may record some of the following:

  • All sorts of things that happen.
  • I try to record related Scriptures. (Writers, these are good fodder for devotionals, articles, and even books!)
  • Ideas for study, teaching, and writing.
  • Add to my “want to read” list.
  • Names of people and ways to encourage them.
  • Decision-making charts.
  • Ministry evaluation.
  • New people I meet and pertinent facts about them.
  • Goals, plans, dreams.
  • Brain download of random thoughts, ideas from the day.

Before I go to bed, I pull all the things I have written, emailed and texted to myself into my journal. And, I usually think of things I need to add!

Don’t get bogged down with how you journal or what you put in your journal—just start journaling!

Don’t miss Pt. 2! Find it here tomorrow morning.

Click to Tweet: Make your own rules! Your unique personality will shine brightly through entries that reflect the spiritual, emotional, mental, and phsycial aspects of your life. –Shirley Crowder on Journaling: A Good Practice (Part 1) #InspiredPrompt #journaling