Adventures in Fatherhood by Carlton Hughes and Holland Webb

I’m happy to announce that our own Crew Member, Carlton Hughes, has co-authored a great book. Here are the details:

Adventures in Fatherhood

Adventure along with two dads in a devotional journey full of wisdom and warning.

Being a great father is not for the weak of heart! It’s an adventure every step of the way. Whether you’re fixing boo-boos and changing diapers, or coaching soccer and carpooling teenagers, you’ll find spiritual insight and practical advice in this devotional by Carlton Hughes and Holland Webb. The authors blend personal experiences with humor and spiritual application to encourage you, dad, to do your best for God and for your family.

Ellie Claire’s devotionals offer short inspirational readings, paired with inspiring quotes and Scripture verses to encourage your heart.
FEATURES:
  • Devotions written specifically for dads
  • Rugged, durable package
  • Perfect size for coat pocket or briefcase
  • Presentation page for personalization
  • Ribbon marker
  • A great gift for Father’s Day, dad’s birthday, or Christmas

Buy Link

Click to tweet: Adventures in Fatherhood. Short inspirational readings, paired with inspiring quotes and Scripture verses to encourage your heart. #fatherhood #faith


Carlton Hughes, represented by Cyle Young of Hartline Literary, wears many hats. By day, he is a professor of communication. On Wednesday evenings and Sunday mornings, he serves as a children’s pastor. In his “spare time,” he is a freelance writer. Carlton is an empty-nesting dad and devoted husband who likes long walks on the beach, old sitcoms, and chocolate–all the chocolate. His work has been featured in Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dating Game, The Wonders of Nature, Let the Earth Rejoice, Just Breathe, So God Made a Dog, and Everyday Grace for Men. His latest book is Adventures in Fatherhood, co-authored with Holland Webb and released by the Elle Claire imprint of Worthy/Hachette Publishing.

What’s new?

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By Bonita Y. McCoy

This month with the world going crazy, the Inspired Prompt crew decided to give our readers an update on what’s new with us.

Here’s what the next few months hold for me if everything goes according to plan:

  • I hope to attend the Killer Nashville Conference, August 20-23 in Franklin, Tennessee. This conference is a great time for me to learn more about writing cozy mysteries especially now that I have a series put out by Winged Publications. Book one of the Amy Kate Mystery series, Twisted Plots, is out, but I am in the middle of writing book two, Family Twist.
  • I’ve also entered this conference’s competition, The Silver Falchion Award. I may not win, but it’s a personal victory because I defeated the fear factor and did it.
  • The other conference I am hoping to attend is The Blue Lake Christian Writers Retreat which has been moved to October. I love this retreat because it fits me so well. It’s low-key, full of worship, and the food and people are awesome.

Writing and Publishing:

  • My North Alabama Word Weavers International group put out a thirty-day devotional called Coffee With God which if you know me is a great match. Big coffee drinker.
  • Also, in March, I published the second in my Sawyer Sweet Romance series, Seeds of Love. This story took several rewrites to get the heroine just so. But the story turned out better than I could have hoped and now, I’m truly thankful my Beta readers and editor worked with me to make it a sigh-worthy romance.
  • My other projects on my bulletin board are Merry Christmas Mix-up and Billionaire Cowboy Next Door. To say I’m learning the value of faithfully showing up each day to write is an understatement.

Thanks for checking in with me. I hope the craziness in your own world is balanced by some time with God and keeping in touch with those you love, even if it’s over the internet or by phone.

 

Read a copy of Seeds of LoveSeeds of Love_ebook

Bonita McCoy 2018

 

Bonita Y. McCoy hails from the Great State of Alabama where she lives on a five-acre farm with two cows, two dogs, two cats, and one husband who she’s had for over thirty years. She is a mother to three grown sons and two beautiful daughters-in-law, one who joined the family from Japan. She loves God, and she loves to write. Her articles, devotions, and novels are an expression of both these passions.

Drop by and visit her Facebook Author’s Page or Instagram page or visit her website bonitaymccoy.com where you can find her books, blog, and all the other things she might be doing.

Sign up for her newsletter and stay in touch. Click Here

The Upside-Down Side

Yes, the writing life can be tough. From the get-go, authors need to develop tough hides. Maybe we need to “Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God,…” (Ephesians 6:10-18).

This month, we’ve opened up our hearts and minds, shared our low points and high points. We’ve shared with our readers what we’ve learned from those high and low places, in hopes that we can encourage and strengthen someone else along the way.

In my humble opinion, it’s worth the trouble, the emotional turmoil. The upside is this: Our words appear in print, somewhere, whether in a published novel or right here. Someone will read my thoughts and decide for themselves whether or not I’m truly a writer. Scary thought, yes.

Still, it’s worth it, because I’ve taken the chance and by that chance, made something of an impact.

Click-to-Tweet: The downside of the upside is that someone will know our thoughts and think we should keep them to ourselves.

We’ve opened ourselves up to the world as a poet does, or any other artist sharing their life’s work. We know not everyone will see what we’re trying to convey. But to keep to ourselves what we’ve been given to share is not an option. That’s the same as burying the talent we’ve been given in the ground (Matthew 25:25).

Image by expresswriters via Pixabay

So, the upside is an accomplishment, be it great or small—whether it’s a published article in a local newspaper or a full-fledged novel. Be encouraged to overcome all the emotional turmoil that is a definite downside to the writing life.

Some of the best points we may glean from this month’s discussion is to be strong and courageous. We can overcome the downside doldrums by putting ourselves “out there” in critique groups, writers meetings, and conferences, establishing strong and sometimes lifelong relationships. That’s a definite upside.

Feel free to share experiences in safe places like this one. Comment on our posts and let us know we’ve helped someone along the way. Be encouraged to stay the course. Invest your talents. It’s your time.


A writing prompt for you to finish: You’re sound asleep when the doorbell rings. It’s barely dawn. You open the door to find a large watermelon on the doorstep.

3 Ways the Writing Community Helps During a Writer’s Peaks and Valleys

By Jennifer Hallmark

Emotional highs and lows.  Ebb and flow. Good and bad times. Wax and wane.

All writers have them. One minute you’ve sold an article or wrote a magnificent sentence in the novel or your book has been nominated for an award.

The next, you’re reading another rejection email addressed to occupant, scrapping half of your novel because of plot issues, or you notice a scathing review on Amazon. Or maybe you’re struggling to write because you’re worried about a pandemic. (I never thought I would write those words.)

Many people who pen words are solitary creatures, leaving the computer only for a grocery run or to go to their regular job. You know, the one where you are actually paid? Now many of us are home from the regular job and finding it hard to focus.

Being a writer is a difficult profession. What can we do? Who can we turn to for help in the peaks and valleys?

#WritingCommunity to the rescue.

How does the writing community help?

    1. Other writers give encouragement both online and at conferences/meetings. I cannot stress enough the positive difference in my life when I started going to meetings, then attended my first writing conference. Just knowing other people saw the world as I did was life-changing. The positive feedback gave me the courage to continue.
    2. The writing community can support us through reviews, offering guest post spots, and by purchasing our books. I began my “hobby” by contacting a faith-based free article site and asking if I could upload an article. My first attempt online led to guest posts from other authors, much-needed thoughts on my articles, and even a guest column on an Australian on-line women’s magazine. The community proved invaluable when I released my first novel, Jessie’s Hope.
    3. An important part of writing is to find people who will offer feedback and accountability. When I first began, I thought highly of all my work. Then I joined a local writing group and an online critique group. Yes, there was pain involved when I shared my “darling” and found out it wasn’t as perfect as I thought. But growth occurred and I became a much better writer. Also, writer friends would occasionally check on me to see how I was doing.
    4. They can spread the word on social media. The community, especially on Twitter, shared my articles and book news and even added me to lists about writing. Facebook helped me connect with many people within my own community and share about book signings and nearby places to buy my book.

The writing community took my writing from hobby to career and I’ll always be grateful. I try to pay it forward by offering guest posts and interviews on both my blogs, whether a writer published or not. I share a lot on social media and try to offer feedback when asked. And now I’m working hard to encourage people during this crisis. Pushing past my own fears and paying it forward.

Click to tweet: Small acts of kindness. One writer to another. Help in navigating those deep, lonely valleys. A high-five from others while standing on the mountaintop. Both needed, both appreciated.

Thank you, #WritingCommunity!

Writing prompt: Share in the comments below one way the writing community has helped you, especially during hard times. We’d love to know!

Good Launch Weather

by Kristy Horine

My husband went into the hobby store for a battery tester. The tester was for the wireless stomp pedal that turns the pages on the iPad where he stores his music sheets for the trumpet he plays on Sunday mornings.

He’d been having trouble with the stomp pad. He attacked the problem like he usually does: a serious process of elimination.

First, he changed the batteries. Then, he played around at the angle his feet hit the silver depressor buttons. Then, he jumped online and waded into every forum he could find on stomp pedals. Then, he watched a few YouTube videos. Then, he landed in the hobby store to find all the right wires, gauges, and alligator clips necessary to test batteries.

“Ah.” He nodded his head, rubbed his chin a bit.

Turns out, there was something wonky with the wiring inside the stomp pedal connecting the batteries to the device.

Also turns out the warranty had recently expired.

My husband ordered a DC adapter. He can still use his devices and toot his horn.

Still, there was something that just wouldn’t let go of him. Something that kept him staring into space, rubbing his chin, zoning out on conversations.

It wasn’t long before I received a text. “I’m in the hobby store. Think Sadie would like to shoot off a rocket?”

And so it began.

Each step of the build, a grown man and his five-year-old daughter glued together much more than Part A to Part B. It wasn’t long they had a completed rocket. My husband opened an app.

“Good launch weather.”

We trudged over the fields – the rocket and we three.

A connection here, a countdown there, and the rocket was off in a whoosh of flame and a cloud of smoke. It reached an apex and began a descent. The parachute failed to deploy. The rocket plummeted to earth.

My husband shook his head.

“I’m sorry for the launch failure.”

My mouth fell open a little.

“Are you kidding?!? That launch was perfect. The landing was a little iffy, but the launch was fantastic!”

The rocket lived to launch another day – five more times, to date.

So, what does this have to do with writing?

Everything.

We have a problem, a need or a want, an assignment, or a story spark. Sometimes the writing comes fast, the words falling into perfect places. Sometimes there’s a distraction and one thing leads to another. We go in for a tester and end up standing in a field by a launchpad. T-10 and counting.

There are times we know the beginning. There are times we think we know the beginning. Often, we can only guess at where or how our work might land.

No matter the unknowns, dear writers, today there’s good launch weather. It’s T-10 and writing.

Click-to-Tweet: How is writing a story like launching a rocket? Good Launch Weather – @Kwriteone via @InspiredPrompt – The Emotional Highs and Lows of Writing


Writing Prompt – Using this story starter and photo, write an opening paragraph:   “The heather is blooming on the mountain,” Oriole said. “I’m longing to go.”