So How Do You Find an Editor?

By Cammi Woodall

Our articles this month have told us all about editors. I personally did not realize the different types of editors available. My mental picture was always a hunched figure surrounded by stacks of books, red pencil scribbling and slashing! April’s articles have taught me I have much to learn. So now that we know what an editor does and we know if we need one, how do we find that elusive creature?

  1. Family and friends – We all do it. We have our finished project and we pass it along to a sibling, parent, or friend with the request, “Tell me if you find any errors!” But how many of us have family and friends who edit and proofread professionally? This is a good first step to editing, but often we need more.
  2. Online platforms like Reedsy, Upwork, Ebook Launch, or New York Book Editors. These and other sites like them are staffed by vetted professionals. Most will look at various genres and offer a range of prices.
  3. Let the editors come to you. Authors can post editing jobs on various sites like the Editorial Freelancers Association, Guru, or Servicescape. A writer can post a job listing the specifics, such as what kind of editing needed, total pages, turnaround time, and payment.
  4. Read articles about your favorite authors, scan their social media pages, and look at their websites. Writers will often thank the management team.

A word of caution: there are scams and con artists in the publishing world. Research any editor or service before you pay to make sure they are legitimate. One popular website I have always heard about is pred-ed.com, known as Predators and Editors.  At the time of this writing, the website is under construction and is moving to a new platform with new staff. Keep an eye out for them.

Another popular service I came across is Writer Beware. This service is sponsored through the Science Fiction Writers of America, the Mystery Writers of America, the Horror Writers Association, and the American Society of Journalists and Authors. Writer Beware has a Facebook page, plus can be accessed through accrispin.blogspot.com. It has been going since 1998 and had posts on the blog as recent as March 29 of this year, so it appears to be going strong. Their goal is to help new, aspiring authors as well as established writers. I found information about company alerts, scams, and legal actions. Their March post was updating information from 2011 and 2012 about a company.

We all know that writing a book is not a solitary venture. While we do toil at our keyboards or notebooks alone, a published book requires a team of dedicated members all working for the same goal – that perfect book. Hopefully our help this month will lead you straight to the perfect editor for your project. Happy writing!

Writing Prompt – She didn’t know if she could carry her burden any farthe.

Meet Jennifer Uhlarik–Managing and Acquisitions Editor for Trailblazer Western Fiction

By Jennifer Hallmark

April is all about editors on Inspired Prompt blog. So I’m more than happy to introduce Jennifer Uhlarik, managing and acquisitions editor for Trailblazer Western Fiction, the newest imprint of Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas.

Trailblazer Western Fiction seeks to recapture the glory days of the Western, but with an updated feel that will ignite the hearts and minds of a whole new generation of readers. Trailblazer offers stories that combine the action, adventure, mystery, and romance of the American West, all wrapped up in the rugged men and brave women who left the comfort of life back east to discover and settle untamed lands in the West. Whether historical or contemporary, our westerns tell the stories of those who braved rugged terrain and insurmountable obstacles to make a life in the beauty and vastness of the western frontier.

Welcome, Jennifer! What a great name you have 🙂

You are the managing and acquisitions editor for Trailblazer Western fiction. What drew you to this particular job?

The job really fell in my lap. I’ve been in the writing industry as an author for years, and while I’ve had some successes selling western romance stories, I have other titles, either fully written or in the works, that are more western/less romance. Those have been a much harder sell. So as I was talking with author extraordinaire Eva Marie Everson about the difficulty in selling the more traditional western titles I have, she dropped the idea of opening a western line.

I was already working for Eva in her Southern Fiction line as an editor, so after hearing her out, I thought about it, prayed about it, and a very short time later, I felt like this was the direction God was leading me in. So Eva and I approached Eddie Jones at Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas about opening Trailblazer Western Fiction, and Eddie quickly said yes. And, “poof!” I was the managing editor of Trailblazer Western Fiction. LOL

When you first entered the writing world, did you want to become an editor?

Nnnnoooooo! In fact, years after entering the writing world…when Eva first approached me about working for her as an editor in her Southern Fiction line, it was such an overwhelming idea that I was paralyzed with self-doubt for several days. Tears were shed, friends and family had to give me pep talks, and only after a lot of thought and prayer did I know this was a direction I was supposed to go in.

What are some pros and cons of being an editor?

I think the pros far outweigh any cons. As an editor, I get to read and acquire some amazing fiction, which is always a plus. Another part I love is that I can now help other authors realize their dreams of publication. After years of struggling to find my path to publication, it’s fantastic to know I’m in a place to help others along the way. And it’s also exciting to be able to help other authors hone their stories into that bright, shiny gem that readers will love!

Cons? Well, for one, I can’t take every story. I wish I could, even just to encourage the author. But Trailblazer is small, so there’s no way I could take every story that came across my desk. And…Life is busier when I’m working with an author toward publication of their book. But in those busy times, I refocus on the pros and move right on past these minor cons!

What percentage of your authors are debut authors?

At this moment, fifty percent. However, I don’t have a set formula for how many debut authors vs. established ones I’ll take. It really depends on the story for me. Tell a great story with even a middling amount of skill, and I’ll give it serious consideration.

What submission advice do you have for aspiring authors?

Two things. First, Trailblazer is a niche market, so it’s important that you know the genre. Read western books, get a feel for the genre, and then craft a story that fits.

And second, be sure to study the guidelines and develop a proposal with all the elements listed on our submission page.

As a bonus piece of advice, keep in mind that Trailblazer (and all of the Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas lines) are moving to a Christian worldview, but not overtly Christian style of storytelling for 2020 and beyond. We are still looking for clean reads, so no gratuitous violence, language, etc. But there doesn’t have to be an overt Christian theme or spiritual arc to the story either.

What stories are you and Trailblazer interested in for future publications?

I am open to new and interesting ideas. I love the classic westerns like Louis L’Amour used to write, but I’d also love to find some contemporary westerns, westerns told in a more complex way, or westerns paired with other genres. You can read more of our vision and desires at https://lpcbooks.com/trailblazer-western-fiction-submissions/

Thanks so much for sharing, Jennifer!


Jennifer Uhlarik discovered the western genre as a pre-teen when she swiped the only “horse” book she found on her older brother’s bookshelf. A new love was born. Across the next ten years, she devoured Louis L’Amour westerns and fell in love with the genre. In college at the University of Tampa, she began penning her own story of the Old West. Armed  with a B.A. in writing, she has finaled and won in numerous writing competitions, and been on the ECPA best-seller list numerous times.

In addition to writing, she has held jobs as a private business owner, a schoolteacher, a marketing director, and her favorite—a full-time homemaker. Jennifer is active in American Christian Fiction Writers and lifetime member of the Florida Writers Association. She lives near Tampa, Florida, with her husband, college-aged son, and four fur children.

You can find Jennifer at her website, Facebook, TwitterPinterest, and Instagram.


Sand Creek Serenade

Dr. Sadie Hoppner is no stranger to adversity. She’s fought to be taken seriously since childhood, when her father began training her in the healing arts. Finding acceptance and respect proves especially difficult at Fort Lyon, where she’s come to practice medicine under her brother’s watchful eye.

Cheyenne brave Five Kills wouldn’t knowingly jeopardize the peace treaty recently negotiated between his people and the Army. But a chance encounter with the female doctor ignites memories of his upbringing among the whites. Too intrigued to stay away, tension erupts with the soldiers, and Five Kills is injured.

As he recuperates under the tender care of the pretty healer, an unlikely bond forms. However, their fledgling love is put to the test when each realizes that a much greater danger awaits—a danger they are wholly unable to stop, and one which neither may survive.

Purchase link

Working with the Industry: Editor Interview with Karin Beery

This month’s “Working with the Industry” posts are a real eye opener for me. I just love to learn. And when the lesson has anything to do with improving my writing skills, I’m all ears.

All of us need a helping hand every once in a while. Your critique partners and Beta readers may think your story is the next best thing to hit the market. However, once you expose it to someone who is working in the writing industry it may still need work.

For my editor interview, I asked a few questions of my editor friend Karin Beery. I first met Karin while we commiserated in the same critique group for about a year. She is a champion of helping others achieve a quality product they can be proud to present for publication.

Be teachable. If you’re unwilling to take an editor’s advice, there’s no point in hiring an editor.

What is the best advice you can give to an established writer and newbie alike on the writing craft?
Be teachable. Even if you’ve been in the industry for a while, things change. Editors should be aware of those changes. If you’re unwilling to take an editor’s advice, there’s no point in hiring an editor.

What book have you read that you would have loved to edit, and how would you have changed it to your liking?
I don’t necessarily want to name the book because I don’t want to embarrass anyone, but several years ago I read a fantasy book that “everyone” was talking about. It was simultaneously the most interesting and most boring book I’ve ever read! Since then I’ve ready many books with the same three common issues:

  • stereotypical characters
  • spending too much time describing unnecessary details (such as exactly what each character is wearing in every scene) while failing to describe necessary components (like establishing scene setting)
  • not enough conflict.

How does an author know when the time is right to engage an editor before publication?
Ask! Almost every editor I know will provide a free sample edit/review of at least the first few pages. I’ve told several authors that they aren’t ready for editing yet, then offered suggestions for how they can strengthen their writing. If you’re afraid to ask an editor, then find someone in the publishing industry for their honest input (and be ready for honesty!).

What should a writer expect when entering into a contract with an editor?
 Regardless of what kind of an edit a writer needs, there are a few things they should expect from any competent, professional editor:

  • Edits/Comments – if you get a clean manuscript back, that’s not actually a good sign. No one’s perfect (even published books have typos!). If your editor can’t find anything wrong with your story, he/she might not know what to be looking for.
  • Proper Edits/Comments – proofreads are the last step in the editorial process. If your proofread includes rewrites and restructuring, that’s not really a proofread. Make sure you know the difference between the services so you’re getting the right edit.
  • Industry Standards – an editor’s job is to help you clean up your manuscript, not to rewrite it to his/her personal beliefs or preferences.
About Karin Beery

Editor. Teacher. Novelist.

A passionate lover of fiction, Karin doesn’t just write novels, she helps others write their best stories! A certified substantive editor with the Christian Editor Connection, her goal is to help authors to put her out of business by equipping them with the tools they need to become better writers.

Want to know more about Karin?

Connect with her at: KarinBerry.com, FaceBook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Working With the Industry: Meet Jr. Agent Hope Bolinger

Hello, friends! In the writing world, it’s good to know about the industry and the people who work there. Today, I interview Hope Bolinger, Jr. Agent at Hartline Literary Agency. You’ll enjoy hearing what she has to say in response to our thought-provoking questions–Jennifer

Writer journaling in a book

Hi, Hope! Please tell our readers, what is an agent’s purpose?

Hope: Essentially, being an agent boils down to two things: coach and cheerleader. We want to steer our clients in the best direction in the publishing industry. We pinpoint snags in contracts and try to help them attain the best deals possible for their books. We also want to be the author’s biggest advocate when approaching publishers. We don’t take on clients unless we love their work because we have to sell it again with equal or more vigor to the industry professionals who can help make their dreams become a reality.

How hard is it to be an agent in today’s publishing industry?

Hope: It’s difficult in the aspect that publishers are inundated with hundreds, thousands of manuscripts. Even as an agent, you have a lot of competition with other agents who are trying to help authors break into the industry. I will say it becomes easier the more you connect with editors at writing conferences and in one-on-one meetings. In the traditional publishing world, especially with the biggest houses, an agent is almost a  necessity.

What three things can a new author do to catch the attention of an agent?

Hope: Great question. I would boil it down to this:

(1) Meet the agent in person if possible. I remember the authors most who pitched to me at writer’s conferences or talked with me after a session. Follow-up emails from conferences are extremely helpful as well.

(2) Make that first page shine. I can usually tell by the first chapter whether or not the client would be a good fit. If the third chapter has good writing, but the first chapter or prologue (please don’t send us your prologues) is an information dump, we’re less inclined to want to take you on.

(3) Build platform before sending your books to us or to a publisher. Especially in nonfiction. It breaks my heart when I have a client with an excellent book, but the publisher turns it down because the author doesn’t have a large enough platform.

What three things can a new author do that will discourage an agent?

Hope: This will be harder to funnel into three main points, but I would say the number one problem I have is an author who comes off as a stalker. As agents, we look for authors who can strike a balance between professional and personal, but the latter half often seeps through more than the former. For instance, we’ve gotten love letters from queries before (even to some of our agents who are married.) 

Second, an author who swings to one of two extremes on platform. We have those who say, “I have no social media whatsoever.” And then we have authors who think they’re hot stuff. Show us all the platform you’ve accumulated, but don’t come off as arrogant or as if agents are doing you a favor. We want this to be a partnership that can last for several years, or even a lifetime.

Third, sending several emails to the agent at once. It’s best to send all the submission materials (Please don’t send all twelve of your books to us at once!) in one email. You can follow-up after 6-8 weeks, or whatever the certain agent has listed on his or her website. But agents receive literally hundreds of emails a day. If twelve of them are from you, they will be less inclined to take you on.

 5. Are you open for submissions? What are you looking for?

Hope: I am personally open for submissions (some of the agents at C.Y.L.E. are closed right now). I do a mix of fiction and nonfiction, but my sweet spots are YA (Young Adult), MG (Middle Grade),  Historical (especially anything ancient), Thriller, and Humor. I’m especially looking to sell in the ABA markets (American Bookseller Association.) Please no memoir (unless you have a significant platform), horror, self-published books, poetry, stage plays, or erotica. If you have a submission you think would be a good fit, send a query to hope@cyleyoung.co

Thanks so much, Hope for all the great advice. And readers, make sure you keep a watch for Hope’s novel, Den, to be released by Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas, June 3, 2019

Check here for details about the progress of her book: http://www.illuminateya.com/books/comingsoon/den/

Click to tweet: What three things can a new author do to catch the attention of an agent? Hartline Literary Agency Jr. Agent, Hope Bolinger, answers this question and many more. #WritersLife #amwriting


Den

Danny was told sophomore year was supposed to be stressful . . . but he didn’t expect his school to burn down on the first day.

To add to his sophomore woes, he—and his three best friends—receive an email in their inboxes from the principal of their rival, King’s Academy, offering full-rides to attend the prestigious boarding school. Danny says no. His overbearing mother says yes. So off he goes.

From day one at King’s, Danny encounters horrible hazing initiations, girls who like to pick other people’s scabs, and cafeteria food that could turn the strongest stomachs sour. As he attempts to survive, he will have to face his fears or fall prey to the King’s Academy lions.


ABOUT HOPE BOLINGER

Literary Agent. Published Novelist.

Hope wants to help authors understand the publishing industry.

Since she started writing novels at 16, she’s been trying to crack the tricky code of how to catch an editor’s eye. She’s learned a lot along the way and wants to help authors find an in in this crazy industry.

Hope Bolinger is a professional writing major at Taylor University. She has served in various roles at IlluminateYA Fiction, Hartline Literary Agency, N 2 Publishing, and The Echo. Over 200 of her works (plays, poems, articles) have appeared in various publications. Her most recent success is having her YA novel Den contracted by Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas, scheduled to release June 3, 2019.

Indie Publishing: Create and Sell Digital Products

By Susan Neal

Do you have a product that’s not long enough to be a book but would still be valuable to a reader? You can easily create a digital product and sell it on your website or through a link in an article. This blog post will provide step-by-step instructions on how to create digital products, so you can start earning money.

To make a digital product, you need to properly format the document. First, develop a front matter page with a disclaimer, copyright, and notice that the buyer may not reprint or give away this product. Construct a table of contents to correspond with the content of your product. Insert a header with page numbers and title of the product and a footer with a copyright symbol “©—all rights reserved” and your website.

Next, build the back matter including an about the author section and a blurb regarding any other books or products you sell. Include your social media links. Finish up with a colorful cover just like an e-book because the cover is the first thing a potential buyer will see. I use Pro_Ebook Covers on Fiverr.com to design my covers for a minimal cost.

After you format your digital product upload it to Gumroad.com. I have used this company to sell my products since 2016. This business’s website is simple and easy to use.

It is free to create an account and make as many digital products as you want. You are not charged until you sell a product. Gumroad’s fee is 8.5% of your selling price + $.30 per sale. To create a product, click “add a product” under the products tab, and follow the instructions to upload your PDF and cover. Add a compelling description of your item and a price.

Gumroad takes care of the financial transaction and deducts their fees from the payment that they receive from the buyer. You are paid on a monthly basis and the money is electronically deposited. It is that simple, and you do not pay anything until you make a sale.

One of my best selling digital products, How to Prevent, Improve, and Reverse Alzheimer’s and Dementia, contains 24 interventions to prevent these devastating diseases. Every week I receive an email from Gumroad notifying me that another one of my products, like this one, sold.

To add your newly created product to your website Gumroad provides embedded coding for you to install. You copy and paste the code into your site. This company also provides a link for you to use in emails, blogs, and articles, so you can advertise your products.

It is up to you to do the marketing. You can check out four digital products that I sell on my website at http://christianyoga.com/dvd-products. I include links to my digital products in the bio section of my articles and blogs.

Check out my two best selling products on Gumroad:

How to Prevent, Improve, and Reverse Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Eat to Live: with a Low-Carbohydrate, Low-Glycemic, Anti-Inflammatory Diet

Now you can begin selling your digital products as well. For fiction authors, you could sell character sketches and the backstory for your heroine and hero. What other type of digital product could you create? Please share below.

Writing Prompt: What type of digital product can you create?

Click to tweet: Do you have a product that’s not long enough to be a book but would still be valuable to a reader? You can easily create a digital product and sell it on your website or through a link in an article. This blog post will provide step-by-step instructions on how to create #digital products, so you can start earning money.  #IndieAuthors


7 Steps to Get Off Sugar and Carbohydrates (back cover description)

Over half of Americans live with a chronic illness, primarily due to the overconsumption of sugar and refined carbohydrates. Seven Steps to Get Off Sugar and Carbohydrates provides a day-by-day plan to wean your body off of these addictive products and regain your health. These changes in your eating habits will start your lifestyle journey to the abundant life Jesus wants you to experience. Not a life filled with disease and poor health.

You will learn:

  • how to eliminate brain fog, cure diseases, and lose weight
  • foods that damage versus foods that are beneficial—the ones God gave us to eat, not the food industry
  • healthy food alternatives and menu planning
  • the science behind food addiction, Candida, and emotional reasons we overeat
  • to identify food triggers and use God’s Word to fight impulsive eating
  • resources—educational videos and books, meal planning, support organizations, recipes

Jesus said in John 10:10, “The thief’s purpose is to steal, kill and destroy. My purpose is to give life in all its fullness” (TLB). Are you living life in its fullness? Is your health or weight impeding you from embracing a healthy, bountiful life? Take these simple seven steps and regain the life you were created for. You will love the new you! Link to Susan’s book: Amazon


Susan Neal’s mission is to improve the health of the body of Christ. She has her RN and MBA degrees, as well as a master’s in health science. She is a Certified Christian Health and Wellness Coach with the American Association of Christian Counselors.

Her book 7 Steps to Get Off Sugar and Carbohydrates won the Selah award. Her most recent publications, Christian Study Guide for 7 Steps to Get Off Sugar and Carbohydrates and Healthy Living Bullet Journal release in August 2018. Susan blogs and provides healthy menus, recipes, and corresponding grocery lists on HealthyLivingSeriesBlog.com.

Susan lives on five acres and grows her own organic fruits and vegetables. She loves swimming, horseback riding, and gardening.

You can follow Susan on:

her Facebook

Scripture Yoga Facebook

Healthy Living Series Facebook

Twitter

YouTube

Pinterest

Instagram

linkedin 

Google plus