If Tomorrow Were Christmas

 

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Corrie Ten Boom – Who can add to Christmas? The perfect motive is that God so loved the world. The perfect gift is that He gave His only Son. The only requirement is to believe in Him. The reward of faith is that you shall have everlasting life.

 

If tomorrow were Christmas and the presents weren’t wrapped,

The pies needed filling, the gingers weren’t snapped.

If tomorrow were Christmas and the stockings lay limp,

the fire didn’t roar, the tree mostly bent.

If tomorrow were Christmas and the cards had no stamps,

The turkeys sat frozen, the lights had no amps

Would Christmas still come if nothing got done?

 

If tomorrow were Christmas and the hymns were not sung,

The flights were delayed, the wreaths never hung.

If tomorrow were Christmas and the snow didn’t fall,

The stores wouldn’t open, the kids couldn’t call.

If tomorrow were Christmas and the bells didn’t ring,

The pudding went flat, there were no carols to sing.

Would Christmas still come if nothing got done?

 

If tomorrow were Christmas, what would it bring?

Rushing and stressing, or worshiping the King?

If tomorrow were Christmas, what would it hold?

Feasts for our bodies, or feasts for our souls?

If tomorrow were Christmas, what would it be?

All about Jesus, or all about me?

Yes, Christmas would come if nothing got done.

 

For presents and singing and eating and such

The myriad of things, on which we spend so much

Are tidbits and pieces of the true celebration

Of God’s only Son; man’s hope and salvation.

So, open the presents and hang the wreaths

Call the kids and enjoy the feast.

For Christmas Day has come to us; it’s nothing we have done.

And the Award Goes To…

What better way to end our month-long pursuit of modern literature, than to talk about one of the greatest among the band of Christian writers. In a few days, Francine Rivers will receive ACFW’s Lifetime Achievement Award. You can read Rivers’ comments on the upcoming award here.

RL 20th_1Rivers first gained my attention (along with most everyone’s) with Redeeming Love. That book took my breath away. I’d never been so annoyed with a character, or loved a character so well. And by the end of the book, I wanted to repent all over again. So I read the book a second time. It’s one of those you might as well buy and store on your shelf, because you’ll want to read it more than once. And I know it’s not always about the numbers, but she’s sold over a million copies of that book.

Throughout August, we’ve talked about several categories of modern literature–poetry, mystery, fiction, dystopian, Indy-published, small publishers, and mega hits. We’ve tried to put our finger on the pulse of the future of modern literature. Who will survive the tsunami of novels, books, and stories being published? Thousands per day! Who will rise to the top? Will those who’ve held on so long keep their place? Agatha Christie, Dickens, Austen, Bronte? Tolkien, Lewis, Carroll, Baum?

Or how about Dumas, who penned one of my favorite lines–

“Often we pass beside happiness without seeing it, without looking at it, or even if we have seen and looked at it, without recognizing it.”
Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo

And so, we leave the month of August and the subject of Modern Literature–some gladly–others with remorse. Though this month contained a full thirty-one days, it was not enough to scratch the surface of the subject. What else can we do but move on…to football.

31aRWoij1WL._BO1,204,203,200_Yes, September is prime football season. I hope you’ll join us throughout the month. It’s okay if you’re not a football fan–we’ll also share some yummy recipes for Superbowl parties or tailgating. And maybe inspire you or tickle your funny bone. I’ll leave you with this quote from probably the only football movie I ever really liked–

“And so it went in football. The game attracted the very people most likely to get in trouble outside”
Michael Lewis, The Blind Side (Movie Tie-in Edition)

Writing Prompt – complete the prompt in the comments section below for a double entry in our quarterly drawings.

I live on a small houseboat anchored along the shore of a tiny island in the Puget Sound. I chose this spot in order to watch the incredible sunrises and sunsets. And in the dark of night, with a blanket of stars overhead…

 

Thoughts on Self Publishing with Ethan Bethune

Here to talk today about self-publishing at Writing Prompts, I’d like to introduce my friend Ethan Bethune. He is a captivating poet, photographer, and he aspires to publish his first book at the start of the year.

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As children we kept journals. We wrote essays for things like 9/11. But I never thought I’d fall in love with writing. Now I write poetry, essays, and short stories. Some for my younger brother and sister, who are special needs children.

Now onto the self-publishing bit. 15 years ago it probably had a lot of stigma around it. I don’t know for sure, but I do know that if you self published, it was pretty obvious because your book was the one that looked like a government food label. And it screamed that you had important things to say, but no one would listen.

But today I will probably be using this indie publishing. It just makes sense. I’ve talked to publishing companies or houses. They on a good day, only ask for your college tuition or left lung…mere Micro fees.

With self publishing, I get so many options that still allow me to have control, or outsource the ones I don’t like ( such as cover design, editing, book binding, etc.).

The biggest thing is it’s affordable. Because it’s printed on demand while being available online as well, and still purchasable globally anywhere from Canada, to our cousins across the pond, to the girl next door on her way to Barnes and Noble.

So for me it just makes sense. I mean, my first book of essays and poetry titled Bleeding Ink is not the easiest thing to get published. I will likely also publish an era series I’ve been posting on my website, titled lettres-de-guerre, War letters, just because it’s hit so well.

With social media as a marketing platform, writing should be fun. I’ve watched artists self publish. And their books were unavailable on Amazon, but using Twitter and all forms of networking to push their book, they’ve sold thousands of copies.

15 years ago? Not the case. I know self publishing or being any kind of indie artist can be overwhelming, but the important thing I think, is that we make good art, regardless of what form we use. So just make things. Because people will read it. These are the stories we leave behind not only for our children, but for everyone.

For more of me, just checkout Regarding Samuel | A writers blog.