Writers, It’s Party Time!

By Tammy Trail

If you plan to publish a new book in 2020, why not consider a Facebook Launch party?

Of course, you will need to create a Facebook author page. This page is specifically for the public to learn about your new book, and about you as the author. It’s your place to shine.

A great header on your page can help to advertise your book. Include the title, and a little bit about your book. Perhaps tease your audience with a bit of backstory or the world you have created for your characters. For instance, the setting for my new story is New Mexico. I plan to use hot air balloons as a backdrop for my setting. So, I could possibly use hot air balloons in my header to entice my reader into finding out more. Just remember to make it stand out to catch the eye. It’s also a good idea to create and post a book trailer on your page to engage your guests.

As your potential reader, I will need to know where I can find your book, and when will it be available? Maybe do a cover reveal during your launch party, and get your readers involved by guessing from the cover where your story takes place. You could garner some enthusiasm with a giveaway. A copy of your book, a gift card, or an item that may go along with the theme of your story.

Next, you will want to create an event for your Facebook Launch party. Go to Facebook options for full instructions on setup. Make sure you invite all of your friends. Encourage your friends to tell their friends about your new book that will be available soon. Allow your page to be public so that it may be shared in the Facebook world.

Guests will want to get to know you better. Share yourself with them, provide a bio, your social media links, and an opportunity to sign up for your newsletter, follow your new author page on Facebook, share your blog information and how they can follow you there. Ask them to follow you on Goodreads and encourage them to post comments about your book.

  • Post writing prompts for your guest to finish in order to win a prize.
  • Have your guests pick who wrote the best prompt to determine the winner.
  • Keep your attendees engaged by using games of trivia, or sharing what they like best about a movie character, story settings, or favorite heroes or heroines from books they have read.
  • Food is also a great topic to share.

The possibilities are only as endless as your imagination. Just remember to have fun!

Writing is hard work, but that is just the beginning of your journey. You are set to make wonderful new friends who are writers like yourself and want to encourage you, or readers who will fall in love with your story. Promoting yourself and the product you have worked so hard on should be fun and engaging. So, get creative.

Writing Prompt: Helen has a  novel coming out, and needs ideas for a cover. What do some of your favorite book covers include? Help Helen out be giving her some great advice.

Click to Tweet:  Let the good times roll #Facebook launch party.

Description: How Much Is Too Much?

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By Bonita Y. McCoy

Description in a story has two jobs. It helps the reader to understand the scene and allows them to use their imagination to picture the action in their minds.

But have you ever picked up a book and found that it went on and on and on about how a character looked or how the room was decorated?

Reading a novel that contains too much description is like listening to a monotone teacher on a warm afternoon, guaranteed to bore. The reader will flip pages trying to locate the action.

However, a novel that doesn’t contain enough description can leave the reader wandering around the story, lost and confused. It also leaves the reader feeling cheated, thinking he only got half of the novel and that the other half is still stuck somewhere in the writer’s brain.

So, how do we measure how much is enough?

Since there are no hard and fast rules, I put together a few questions that can be used to determine if your description is hitting the mark or if it needs some TLC.

Does the description slow down the pace of the story?

If the description acts like a speed bump in a scene, it is either too long or put in the wrong place. There is a reason why most of the description of a setting is done at the beginning of the scene. One, it puts your reader right in the heart of what’s going on, and two, its out of the way once the dialogue and action starts.

You never want your description to slow down the car chase or interrupt an argument between characters. Action beats are one thing; a long drawn out description of the forest is another.

Does the description add to the plot?

If you tend to tell every movement of a character in minute detail, you are doing what I call housekeeping. You are giving your reader a laundry list of everyday activities that they can fill in for themselves. These don’t add to the plot. They instead lessen the readers involvement in the story.

However, description can be used to add flavor to the plot. In Call of the Wild, one of the characters has no name; he is only known by the description, the man in the red sweater. The description shows the reader that the man is a stranger to the point of view character, and being a scoundrel, he isn’t worth getting to know.

Good choices in what to describe and how to describe it, not only draw your reader into the story but can add spice to your plot.

 Are you over using adjectives and adverbs?

The first lesson I learned in novel writing was to use adverbs and adjectives sparingly. The irony that they use an adverb to explain to us about not using adverbs is not lost on me. However, the advice still applies.

If you use adverbs and adjectives to prop up your word choices, you are cluttering your story. It shows that your nouns and verbs do not convey your meaning, and you are feeling unsure that the reader will understand.

Most of the time, your word choice works fine without the adverb or adjective, but if you aren’t sure, try using a thesaurus to find a word that better shows your meaning. An example of that would be Carol was very angry compared to Carol seethed. One word was able to take the place of three, and the reader got a clearer understanding of Carol’s emotions.

When in doubt about a word choice, check your thesaurus.

Are you trying to use the research you love?

As writers, we all do research, and sometimes, we fall in love with it. We become enamored and want to share all that we have learned with our readers, even at the expense of too much description.

Be honest, does your reader need to know all there is to know about llama care? Even if it’s interesting and you adopted a llama, if it’s not moving the plot forward, it needs to be cut.

Click to tweet: Use only the research that adds depth to your characters or enhances the plot. Everything else is llama liability. #llama #amwriting

These questions are only a start, but they should give you a clearer picture of how you are doing with your use of description. Knowing how much is too much is tricky, even those who have been writing for years find it hard to tell, but with practice, it will get easier to spot its over use. At least, that’s what I hear.

 

Prompt: The editor wanted half the description gone. Martha wanted to throw the piece of work out the window, but she knew that wouldn’t do any good. She had spent months researching the Appalachian Mountains and hated to leave out any of the imagery and colors she had seen on her trips. Frustration filled her. How was she supposed to decide what to keep and what to cut?

Working With the Industry: The Importance of Editing

By Michael Ehret

“Everyone needs an editor.”

These are words I have spoken—as an editor—to many writers who wondered if they needed to spend money on editing. Yes. Yes, you do. And I don’t say that as a freelance editor who likes to eat and sleep indoors.

I say that as a mentoring editor who wants to see every client succeed. It was true then and it’s true now. It will always be true.

Everyone needs an editor.

Then one day The Publishing Fairy knocked on my door.

“Yoo-hoo!” She flitted into the room on preposterously tiny wings, flinging eraser shavings like they were glitter. “Your writing group, The Penwrights, is putting together a collection of novellas and we’d like you to write one. You in?”

After a quick pinch to make sure I was awake—hey, I’m a writer and I daydream—I agreed.

Just like that, I was on the other side of the keyboard and writing on deadline. Jinkies! Fortunately, I am an editor, so I could shave a little time by skipping…

“Oh,” the PF said right before she typed -30- and left the room, “Everyone needs an editor. Remember that.”

“Right,” I said. Everyone but me, because I’m an editor.

The perfect manuscript

So, after I finished my story, “Big Love,” I dutifully sent it off to the editor, Linda Yezak, knowing that while she might find an occasional typo or missing word, extensive editing was not needed. It was close to perfect, I said all humble, as I tried not to break my arm patting myself on the back.

But—and I’m not sure exactly how this happened—when I received my manuscript back, there were edits. On every page.

No, really. The manuscript was full of them.

She called me “dash happy” and even questioned my parentage! Apparently, writing—like—William Shatner talks—is—a little—too much—style. And I guess I prefer the British spellings of certain words to the less colourful American spellings. So kill me.

But then it got worse.

Linda—bless her heart!—said I wrote a cliché. Or, maybe, several. Land o’ Goshen! That woman couldn’t see the forest for the trees. She left no stone unturned trying to ferret out clichés. In a nutshell, at the end of the day, even though she was bold as brass, Linda was right (that hurts) because two wrongs don’t make a right and two (or more) clichés don’t make great sentences. Am I right?

But she wasn’t done

A good editor walks the line between suggesting improvements and making improvements. In the following example, Linda suggested that I could do a better job of showing Rafe’s evolving feelings for Berly. She was right—again. Here’s the original:

He opened his file for another review of his research and was gripped again by her eyes in the IBJ portrait piece—as well as the playfulness of the pose. The photographer had shot her as Rosie the Riveter, only she had a hammer in her hands. It was cute. Very cute.

And then, from the final manuscript:

He opened his file for another review of his research and saw Timberly’s portrait again. Those eyes. So deep and sparkling with playfulness. The photographer had shot her as Rosie the Riveter, only she had a hammer in her hands. It was cute. And charming. 

In the first—“was gripped again by her eyes”—is narrative telling. The second—“Those eyes. So deep and sparkling with playfulness”—is deeper POV showing. The reader sees Berly’s eyes from Rafe’s point of view, not mine.

Linda, like any fine editor, took my story, in my voice, and showed me ways to improve it—make it stronger. That is the benefit of a great editor. And that is why—say it with me!—everyone needs an editor. Even me.

Click to tweet: Everyone needs an editor. Just ask Michael Ehret. #amwriting #WritersLife


Michael Ehret has accepted God’s invitation to write with Him and is also a freelance editor at WritingOnTheFineLine.com. In addition, he’s worked as editor-in-chief of the ACFW Journal magazine for the American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW), was editor-in-chief of the Christian Writers Guild, and he pays the bills as the Assistant Bookstore Coordinator for the Indianapolis Public Library. His novella, “Big Love,” appears in the collection Coming Home: A Tiny Home Collection.

He’s been married for 37 years to Deb and they have three children, one dog (a miniature Schnauzer named Baxter), and a granddog. He’s currently working on a new novel that WILL need editing.


Coming Home ~ A Tiny House Collection

Tiny houses are all the rage these days, but what can you do with something so small? Here are seven stories about people chasing their dreams, making fresh starts, finding love, stumbling upon forgiveness, and embarking upon new adventures in tiny houses. Travel with them around the country in this big novella collection.

Love is Sweeter in Sugar Hill: She has a tiny house. He lives in a mansion. She vows to charge a doctor with malpractice. His job depends on that doctor’s finances. Will love find a way?

Kayla’s Challenge: She was one “I do” short of marrying the man her pushy parents chose for her. Now, half a country away, she needs a tiny house to finally be free.

If These Walls Could Talk: Both claim to have inherited the same Queen Anne until an unexpected blessing changes everything.

First Love: Betrayed by her husband and desperate for healing, she can only move forward by going back home.

Dash of Pepper: His responsibilities tie him to the small town he loves, but her career plans will lead her to the big city. Will he cut his roots for her or will she clip her wings for him?

Big Love: Homelessness expanded her world and constricted his. Now she needs his help, but he only remembers the pain. Can they find big love in a tiny house?

The Light Holding Her: Friends since childhood. She’s being stalked. He’s in danger. Is their faith big enough to carry them through the trials into a deeper relationship?

Working with the Industry: Editor Interview with Karin Beery

This month’s “Working with the Industry” posts are a real eye opener for me. I just love to learn. And when the lesson has anything to do with improving my writing skills, I’m all ears.

All of us need a helping hand every once in a while. Your critique partners and Beta readers may think your story is the next best thing to hit the market. However, once you expose it to someone who is working in the writing industry it may still need work.

For my editor interview, I asked a few questions of my editor friend Karin Beery. I first met Karin while we commiserated in the same critique group for about a year. She is a champion of helping others achieve a quality product they can be proud to present for publication.

Be teachable. If you’re unwilling to take an editor’s advice, there’s no point in hiring an editor.

What is the best advice you can give to an established writer and newbie alike on the writing craft?
Be teachable. Even if you’ve been in the industry for a while, things change. Editors should be aware of those changes. If you’re unwilling to take an editor’s advice, there’s no point in hiring an editor.

What book have you read that you would have loved to edit, and how would you have changed it to your liking?
I don’t necessarily want to name the book because I don’t want to embarrass anyone, but several years ago I read a fantasy book that “everyone” was talking about. It was simultaneously the most interesting and most boring book I’ve ever read! Since then I’ve ready many books with the same three common issues:

  • stereotypical characters
  • spending too much time describing unnecessary details (such as exactly what each character is wearing in every scene) while failing to describe necessary components (like establishing scene setting)
  • not enough conflict.

How does an author know when the time is right to engage an editor before publication?
Ask! Almost every editor I know will provide a free sample edit/review of at least the first few pages. I’ve told several authors that they aren’t ready for editing yet, then offered suggestions for how they can strengthen their writing. If you’re afraid to ask an editor, then find someone in the publishing industry for their honest input (and be ready for honesty!).

What should a writer expect when entering into a contract with an editor?
 Regardless of what kind of an edit a writer needs, there are a few things they should expect from any competent, professional editor:

  • Edits/Comments – if you get a clean manuscript back, that’s not actually a good sign. No one’s perfect (even published books have typos!). If your editor can’t find anything wrong with your story, he/she might not know what to be looking for.
  • Proper Edits/Comments – proofreads are the last step in the editorial process. If your proofread includes rewrites and restructuring, that’s not really a proofread. Make sure you know the difference between the services so you’re getting the right edit.
  • Industry Standards – an editor’s job is to help you clean up your manuscript, not to rewrite it to his/her personal beliefs or preferences.
About Karin Beery

Editor. Teacher. Novelist.

A passionate lover of fiction, Karin doesn’t just write novels, she helps others write their best stories! A certified substantive editor with the Christian Editor Connection, her goal is to help authors to put her out of business by equipping them with the tools they need to become better writers.

Want to know more about Karin?

Connect with her at: KarinBerry.com, FaceBook, Twitter, and Instagram.

The Mystery of the Inspiring Author

by Tammy Trail

I am sitting in my office deciding which author I should choose to focus on for this month’s blog post. Too many to list. Do I pick a current favorite, or chose one from childhood?

We moved around a lot while I was growing up in the 70’s. I think being the new kid is the worst thing, ever. After spending a week or two in a new classroom you realized most of the kids sitting around you lived in the same neighborhoods, attended the same church together and shared the same classrooms from preschool to middle school. I absolutely hated middle school. You could not pay me enough money to relive those years.

Instead of being Miss Popularity (never even got close), I was the bookworm. I had a book with me everywhere I went (I still do). While my classmates were visiting before class, I would pull out my book and read. Once in awhile a teacher had to physically remove a book from my hands  to get my attention. I heard a familiar phrase during those years,  that while they appreciated my love of reading, I had to learn other skills too. So, in honor of that geeky, scrawny, metal mouth pre-teen I am going to choose Carolyn Keene, author of the beloved Nancy Drew mystery series. My favorite Nancy Drew book was “The Secret of Shadow Ranch.”  I imagined myself right there with Nancy as she searched for clues and dared to go against tradition and prove girls can achieve wonderful things just as well as boys can, or maybe even better sometimes.

While doing a bit of research I found that the name Carolyn Keene was a pseudonym for several authors. No one person came up with all of those page-turning stories, but several writers authored the Nancy Drew books. One was Mildred Wirt Benson who wrote under the pen name from 1929 to 1947. She wrote the first twenty-three books of the original thirty book series. I also was amazed to find that her second marriage to George A. Benson, an editor for the Toledo Blade, landed her in my home town of Toledo, Ohio. Mildred was a bit of an adventurer herself, and a fearless like Nancy Drew. She made trips to Central America, traveling through the jungles in a jeep and canoed down rivers, to scout out cultural sites. In 2001 Mildred Benson received a special Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for her work on the Nancy Drew series.

Click to Tweet: I imagined myself right there with Nancy (Drew) as she searched for clues and dared to go against tradition, prove girls can achieve wonderful things just as well as boys can… from @trail_j via @InspiredPrompt #mystery #amreading


I still like a good suspense or mystery story to read. If you are so inclined, feel free to indulge in my story. I wrote a historical romance, with a bit of intrigue for a compilation with three other authors. I hope you will find enjoyment from all the stories.Tammy Trail, Mary Vee, Pamela Thibodeaux

Major John Tennant has recently returned from his post on the frontier to find his home razed to the ground and his children in the care of strangers. He struggles to bring the man responsible for the murder of his family to  justice while providing for his children.

After her fiance is impressed into the Royal Navy, Elaine Henderson is willing to do anything to help her brothers fight against British oppression. For years she has carried a bitterness in her heart until Providence replaces it with two motherless children.

Get Star Spangled Suspense at Amazon