November – Write that novel!

They keep you up at night or wake you early in the morning. They are the characters that are swirling and dancing in all writers. They want out of our brains and onto the paper or screen. It’s time to let them out! Send them on their story journey. Let your characters flow into the story you weave. It’s National Novel Writing Month, your designated month for unabashed writing.

November is the month, and the challenge is on by NaNoWrIMO.ORG to write 50,000 words in November. This equates to a strong and very rough draft of your novel. It’s your jump start to get your story out of your head.

How can this be done? In simplest terms, 1,667 words per day. Just sit down and let them flow. All the excuses are out the window according to a post by NY Book Editors. I need a plan. I need an outline. What about my plot chart? For those of you who are planners, this may be hard. I count myself among you. But when I wrote the first draft of my book during Nano-WriMO a few years ago, it was the most freeing feeling to just sit down everyday and write. My story lines and characters took me in many directions I could have never planned. I ended the month and the draft with 55,152 words and a giant YIPPEE!

To make this fun and a way to connect with others doing the same thing, check out the NANOWriMO website and log in. There are resources and community forums by region of the country, and around the world, that let you know you’re not alone in this challenge. Check around your local community for other writers taking the challenge. Some writer groups hold writing events to help encourage one another. These events include just time to write among other writers, word games to stimulate wordsmithing, and other fun writing exercises for getting those novels drafted.

Move the Halloween candy wrappers aside, and welcome November with a challenge that could be the first step in your next (or first) published book.

I’m in, are you?

7 Tips for accepting the challenge:

  1. If you hit writer’s block, stop and get a glass of water. Drink it. Sit down and write a scene with one of your other characters.
  2. Phone a trusted writing friend if you find yourself slowing down and talk about your story. A fifteen-minute conversation may spur some new ideas.
  3. Even if you are writing a scene and you know there are flaws, keep writing. Something good will come of it in the next draft.
  4. Carve the time anywhere – lunch, carpool, a few minutes before bed.
  5. Mid-month slow-down? Look how far you’ve come! Connect with other writers and keep going.
  6. Feel like you are getting behind in your word count? Keep going. On the off chance you don’t end up with 50,000 words, you will be so much further along.
  7. Remember, no editing, just writing.

Let’s connect:
Facebook and Twitter: @KHRWriter
Instagram: KHRichardson5

3 Questions Wednesday with Kristen Hogrefe

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday, Kristen!

Kristen Hogrefe is an author, speaker, and English teacher. She also serves as a mentor for Word Weavers International and works with the teens in her church’s youth group. Her new release, The Revisionary (Write Integrity Press), is the first book in her YA trilogy The Rogues. The novel is a dystopia of a different kind—one where characters look back to their civilization’s heritage for hope and wisdom to move forward. You can find Kristen outdoors in the Florida sunshine or online at www.KristenHogrefe.com.

Question:  What inspires you?

Kristen:  Many things inspire me. For starters, nature inspires me. God’s creation provides an endless resource for my imagination! Also, my fellow writers (Word Weaver friends) inspire me as do some of my favorite authors and books. However, I think that writing is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration (to borrow that famous quote by Thomas Edison). Writing requires discipline and hard work. Finding inspiration is easy. Putting in the long hours is the tough part, but the end result is worth the effort.

Good answer!

Next question is a bit of fun–You’re a new addition to the crayon box. What color would you be and why?

Kristen: I would be a spiral blue and yellow crayon (same concept as a twisty ice cream cone): yellow for sunshine and blue for ocean. I’m definitely a Florida girl! I’ve lived in the Sunshine State my whole life and keep a volleyball and beach chair in my car trunk—ready for any spontaneous trips.

Yellow is the color of happiness, wisdom, and understanding, according to my trusty “favorite colors” page. Blue is compassionate, and caring, among other things. What those two colors signify to me, is a sunny day with crystal blue skies! Good color choice.

Final Question–As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Kristen: As a child, I wanted to be a veterinarian. I loved animals and didn’t think there could possibly be a better job—that is, until I realized that needles and blood make me queasy. Now, I just have one kitty named Ness, and enjoy writing and teaching.

At one time, I thought a veterinarian would be a good career choice, if a love for animals was all it took. Like you, I reconsidered when faced with the facts. Sounds like you made a good decision!

Readers, I hope you enjoyed this week’s 3 Questions Wednesday. You’ll find Kristen at the following locations:

Kristen is @kjhogrefe on Twitter.

Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/kristenhogrefe.author/

Website: https://kristenhogrefe.com/

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/KristenHogrefe/e/B004FZXG7U/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1


I #amreading Kristen’s newly released YA dystopian novel, The Revisionary–it’s riveting!  Here are the details about the book–

A Revisionary rewrites the rules. A Rogue breaks them. Which one is she?

Nineteen-year-old Portia Abernathy accepts her Revisionary draft to the Crystal Globe with one goal: earn a Dome seat so she can amend the satellite rules and rescue her brother. Her plan derails when Head Gage Eliab brands her as a suspect in a campus Rogue attack, and in her quest to clear her name, she questions if the vigilante Brotherhood responsible might not be the real villain.

Her shifting loyalties pit her against Luther Danforth, her Court Citizen ally who believes in reform, not revolution. Joining the Brotherhood makes a future with him impossible—and Portia must decide if it’s better to rewrite the rules or to break them.

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Indelible Words

by Betty Thomason Owens

What a month it’s been here at the Writing Prompts blog. I enjoyed reading about everyone’s favorite modern author, and I learned we’re a rather eclectic bunch. We like everything from classic reads to childhood favorites, and meaningful, spiritually-uplifting works.

Today’s society, whether they realize it or not–is rich. They have extensive, extravagant libraries available to them, which are growing and expanding every day. If you have a question, you can find hundreds of authors expounding on the answer. There’s a voice out there for you. One or several of those authors will have the words that will speak directly to your mind and heart.

I hate to see the month of March leave, because I’ve so enjoyed reading everyone’s posts. As writers, books hold our hearts and nourish our dreams. They inspire us. We hope our words will someday touch hearts just like that one touched ours.

Thank you, Writing Prompts crew and guests for sharing a bit of your hearts with us.  And thank you, dear readers, for taking time out of your day to read and comment on our heartfelt posts.

We have a bit of excitement in store for April, so don’t miss Monday’s introductory blog post.
Click to tweet: As writers, books hold our hearts and nourish our dreams.

In lieu of a writing prompt, I’d like to ask you a question. If you’re a reader, which modern author has touched your heart? Changed your life? Made you think? Whether it’s teaching, developmental, devotional, or a work of fiction–this author’s words made a lasting (indelible) impression on you.

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