3 Questions Wednesday with Carlton Hughes

Welcome to Wednesday! Today our guest is Carlton Hughes, an author who wears many hats. It’s from his many experiences that his award-winning writing is produced. Let’s get to know him a little better.   Our first question, what do you love most about the writing process? The least?

Carlton:  Like most writers, I love it when the words are flowing, and I am really “feeling” it. I paraphrase the classic quote when I say that, sometimes, I “feel God’s pleasure” when I write like that. The least? I am a hyperactive extrovert, so sitting in a chair in a room by myself to write is a struggle at times.

The discipline of sitting down in a quiet space to let the words flow can be a challenge. Next question: If you could give a novice writer one piece of advice, what would it be? 

Carlton: Don’t give up, even though you may be getting rejections. Trust God with the process and with the timing. I had to learn that the hard way, as I have been rejected by the BEST in Christian publishing and it took quite a while for me to get acceptances! The publications came in ways I never thought they would. God knows your strengths and will use them, in His way and in His time.

God’s timing is perfect even when we don’t understand it, great advice! Final question, Were you a young writer, late-bloomer, or somewhere in-between?

Carlton: I was a young writer. When I was 12, I had a poem published in the old Grit newspaper. Does anyone remember that publication? My grandmother was a subscriber, and, when I saw a call for youth contributions, I jumped at the chance. Then, when I was 13, I was asked to be the middle school correspondent for the high school newspaper. I became editor of that paper as a sophomore and continued until graduation. I like to say that’s how I got addicted to my byline, and I majored in broadcast and print journalism in college. The ink was in my blood from an early age.

Yes, it is in your blood! Thanks for stopping by.

Connect with Carlton online:


Click to Tweet: Don’t give up, even though you may be getting rejections. Trust God with the process and with the timing. I had to learn that the hard way, as I have been rejected by the BEST in Christian publishing and it took quite a while for me to get acceptances! The publications came in ways I never thought they would.


Carlton Hughes Bio:

Carlton Hughes, represented by Cyle Young of Hartline Literary, wears many hats. By day, he is a professor of communication. On Wednesday evenings and Sunday mornings, he serves as a children’s pastor. In his “spare time,” he is a freelance writer. Carlton is an empty-nesting dad and devoted husband who likes long walks on the beach, old sitcoms, and chocolate–all the chocolate. His work has been featured in Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dating Game, The Wonders of Nature, Let the Earth Rejoice, Just Breathe, So God Made a Dog and Everyday Grace for Men. His latest book is Adventures in Fatherhood, co-authored with Holland Webb, and released by the Elle Claire imprint of Worthy/Hachette Publishing.


Being a great father is not for the weak of heart! It’s an adventure every step of the way. Whether you’re fixing boo-boos and changing diapers, or coaching soccer and carpooling teenagers, you’ll find spiritual insight and practical advice in this devotional by Carlton Hughes and Holland Webb. The authors blend personal experiences with humor and spiritual application to encourage you, dad, to do your best for God and for your family.
Ellie Claire’s devotionals offer short inspirational readings, paired with inspiring quotes and Scripture verses to encourage your heart.
FEATURES:
  • Devotions written specifically for dads
  • Rugged, durable package
  • Perfect size for coat pocket or briefcase
  • Presentation page for personalization
  • Ribbon marker
  • A great gift for Father’s Day, dad’s birthday, or Christmas

Not Gonna Say It

by Carlton Hughes

Well, I hate goodbyes.

There. I said it.

I struggle when I visit family (or they visit me) and then we have to part ways. I’m a teacher at my day job, and I get melancholy when students finish my classes, graduate, and move away (Imagine what it was like when my own children did that!). Don’t get me started about the last day of writers conferences when I have to leave my pals I only see once a year (and, this year, not even . . . oh my word).

This post is hard, as you can imagine.

Shirley Crowder, Betty Thomason Owens, Harriet Michael. Photo-bomber alert!

I got to know a lady named Betty Thomason Owens at a writers conference. She witnessed my extreme goofiness (We have a yearly tradition in which I crazily photo-bomb her and other friends) but yet somehow saw something more in me and asked me to be a part of this blog. She introduced me to Jennifer Dison Hallmark, whom I later met in person at another writers conference. That is a really long way to explain how I became a part of the Inspired Prompt Crew. I count the other contributors as friends and have enjoyed sharing this space with them. I appreciate the opportunities provided for me more than they’ll ever know.

I often say that, since we are all a part of the body of Christ, I’m the armpit that makes the funny noises. That is what I’ve tried to do on this blog—stir things up with a lot of humor, a bit of silliness, and a tad of heart. Hopefully, I’ve succeeded with that. Please don’t tell me if I haven’t; I can’t handle the rejection right now. If you’ve read my pieces here, you know how I feel about rejection!

To wind up this post, I am NOT going to say “goodbye” to Inspired Prompt. Instead, I’ll say, “See you later,” “See you around,” “See you on the flipside.”  You have probably heard it before: when God closes one door, He opens another one. Or at least a window. I can’t wait to see what He swings open for such a talented crew.

So good . . . day.

See what I did there?

After while, crocodile!

Adventures in Fatherhood by Carlton Hughes and Holland Webb

I’m happy to announce that our own Crew Member, Carlton Hughes, has co-authored a great book. Here are the details:

Adventures in Fatherhood

Adventure along with two dads in a devotional journey full of wisdom and warning.

Being a great father is not for the weak of heart! It’s an adventure every step of the way. Whether you’re fixing boo-boos and changing diapers, or coaching soccer and carpooling teenagers, you’ll find spiritual insight and practical advice in this devotional by Carlton Hughes and Holland Webb. The authors blend personal experiences with humor and spiritual application to encourage you, dad, to do your best for God and for your family.

Ellie Claire’s devotionals offer short inspirational readings, paired with inspiring quotes and Scripture verses to encourage your heart.
FEATURES:
  • Devotions written specifically for dads
  • Rugged, durable package
  • Perfect size for coat pocket or briefcase
  • Presentation page for personalization
  • Ribbon marker
  • A great gift for Father’s Day, dad’s birthday, or Christmas

Buy Link

Click to tweet: Adventures in Fatherhood. Short inspirational readings, paired with inspiring quotes and Scripture verses to encourage your heart. #fatherhood #faith


Carlton Hughes, represented by Cyle Young of Hartline Literary, wears many hats. By day, he is a professor of communication. On Wednesday evenings and Sunday mornings, he serves as a children’s pastor. In his “spare time,” he is a freelance writer. Carlton is an empty-nesting dad and devoted husband who likes long walks on the beach, old sitcoms, and chocolate–all the chocolate. His work has been featured in Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dating Game, The Wonders of Nature, Let the Earth Rejoice, Just Breathe, So God Made a Dog, and Everyday Grace for Men. His latest book is Adventures in Fatherhood, co-authored with Holland Webb and released by the Elle Claire imprint of Worthy/Hachette Publishing.

The Rejection Badge of Courage

I have been asked to write a post on the “Emotional Highs and Lows of Writing.” I wish the blog powers-that-be would have given me a topic I know something about.

I’m kidding. I’m a kidder.

Actually, if degrees were given for Emotional Highs and Lows of Writing, I would have a doctorate. If awards were given, I would have an Oscar. If money was doled out based on those highs and lows, I would be a zillionaire.

When I first started writing as a calling, it was pure bliss. The exhilaration of putting words on the page and finishing a piece was wonderful. Then I decided to try to get some of those pieces published.

Well, hello, emotional lows.

In those early days, I got enough rejections to wallpaper my house. That’s a bit of an exaggeration, but not by much. And I have been rejected by the absolute BEST in Christian publishing.

Top-tier agents? Major publishing houses? Publishing companies in someone’s basement? Been turned down by all of them.

You can only be rejected so many times until you question yourself and your abilities. Yes, I have heard all the encouragement about rejection—it’s just not your time, your piece didn’t match their needs, it’s not a reflection of your talent. All true, but rejection still hurts.

Slowly but surely, I began getting acceptances. One year I had multiple devotions published in four different books. What an emotional high!

The next year? The lady who does my taxes asked, “Don’t you have any receipts from your writing?” I buried my chin in my chest and answered with a quiet, “No . . . but I’m trying.”

A couple of months after that encounter, I was preparing to attend a big writers conference. I had been preoccupied with my day job and found myself scrambling the week before the event to put together writing samples, one-sheets, and anything and everything else I thought I would need. I stopped for a moment and asked myself, “What am I doing? Why am I doing this?”

My agent was pitching several book proposals, with no word from anyone. Shouldn’t I just quit? Give up? Go fishing instead of to the writers conference?

I actually hate fishing, so I went to the conference, with the idea that I would cut up with my writer friends and maybe talk to some editors/publishers just for fun.

The second day of the conference, I got a call from my agent, telling me he had gotten a serious inquiry from a well-established publishing house about one of my book proposals. I had been on this roller coaster before, so I kept my emotions in check.

Another day passed, another call from my agent. “It’s looking good, but it still has to go to committee.” I wanted so much to get excited, but I suppressed those happy feelings.

The conference ended and I began the three-hour trek home, winding my way through a mountainous area with spotty cell service. Once I hit “civilization,” I stopped at a store to stretch my legs. I checked my phone and saw I had a missed call from my agent. I returned the call.

“We’re in! We’re getting a contract!”

I restrained myself from doing a happy dance in the middle of Wal-Mart.

That book, Adventures in Fatherhood (co-authored with Holland Webb), releases April 7. Proof that God is good and that there is hope in the middle of the highs and lows.

Hang in there, writer friends. It will happen.

Click-to-Tweet: Rejection hurts! “You can only be rejected so many times until you question yourself and your abilities.” The Rejection Badge of Courage – @carltonwhughes via @InspiredPrompt #writerslife #amwriting

Writing Prompt: Start a story using these three words: sunset, shovel, hardhat.


Carlton Hughes

Carlton Hughes, represented by Cyle Young of Hartline Literary, wears many hats. By day, he is a professor of communication. On Wednesday evenings and Sunday mornings, he serves as a children’s pastor. Carlton is an empty-nesting dad and devoted husband who likes long walks on the beach, old sitcoms, and chocolate–all the chocolate. His work has been featured in Chicken Soup for the Soul: The Dating Game, The Wonders of Nature, Let the Earth Rejoice, Just Breathe, So God Made a Dog, and Everyday Grace for Men. His latest book, Adventures in Fatherhood, co-authored with Holland Webb, releases April 7.

Let’s Get Technical

By Carlton Hughes

If I asked, “What is one thing you have written that would surprise others?” I would get numerous answers. What’s my answer?

I have two: standardized test questions and an instructor’s manual for a textbook.

Sounds thrilling, I know. Here’s the deal: they remain the highest-paying freelance jobs I have ever completed, by far.

First, how did I get into writing standardized test questions (and who would want to write those?). A friend’s mother knew a guy at a well-known company that needed writers. I submitted samples, and bam! I became that guy.

My job was to research any topic I wanted, provide some facts, and then write a summary in three different skill levels as a rubric. So I got paid to write on a scale from excellent to POOR about pot-bellied pigs, Babe Didrickson, and the history of radio. Good work if you can get it.

The textbook job was a bit more complicated. I’m a teacher by trade, and we get emails all the time from publishing companies. To be brutally honest, I usually ignore them, but one subject line caught my eye: “Take survey, get money!”

This company wanted feedback on the Interpersonal Communication textbook I have used for years. The survey required me to share my opinions in different areas. I provided highly detailed answers, probably longer than they wanted, but I like big sentences, I cannot lie. I hit “submit,” and, a few weeks later, I was twenty bucks richer.

A month later I was at a WRITERS CONFERENCE taking a continuing class on FREELANCING. Warning: irony ahead!

One morning I checked my email before class, and I had a message from this same company, offering me a contract to write the instructor’s manual for the new edition of the communication text. The money offered was ridiculously good, so I jumped at the chance. The work wasn’t exactly easy, but I did get to use knowledge I already had.

Here’s what I learned from my technical writing experiences:

  1. Write what you know. Most of us don’t sit around writing creative stuff all day (If you do, great!). You might work a public job or have hobbies or skills that could translate to the technical market.
  2. When opportunities come, take them. I took that seemingly innocent survey that led me to my biggest writing job ever; I heard a guy was looking for a question-writer and went for it.
  3. Don’t be a writing snob. Sure, I would love to write award-winning literary works that appear on bestseller lists. But I’m not going to dismiss other opportunities that will sharpen my skills (and pay really well).

So, if Johnny takes the train 200 miles south and then switches trains and goes 80 miles east, what topping will he choose for his pizza for supper?

I’ll wait for your answer . . .

 

Click-To-Tweet: #HowTo break into technical writing! Let’s Get Technical with @carltonwhughes via @InspiredPrompt #freelancewriter


Carlton Hughes wears many hats. By day, he’s a professor of communication at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College. On Wednesday evenings and Sunday mornings, he does object lessons and songs with motions as Children’s Pastor of Lynch Church of God. In his “spare time,” he is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in numerous publications, including Chicken Soup for the Soul and several devotional books from Worthy Publishing—The Wonders of Nature, Let the Earth Rejoice, Just Breathe, So God Made a Dog, and Everyday Grace for Men. His book Adventures in Fatherhood, a 60-day devotional co-authored with Holland Webb, will release in Spring 2020. Carlton and his wife Kathy have two sons, Noah and Ethan, and a daughter-in-law, Kersyn. He is on the planning committee for Kentucky Christian Writers Conference and is a year-round volunteer for Operation Christmas child. Carlton is represented by Cyle Young of Hartline Literary Agency.