Editing: You Lose to Gain

By Jennifer Hallmark

Editing. Such an important part of writing. It might seem counter-productive to write 10,000 words, then take out several hundred while editing. Remember, you lose wordiness to gain clarity.

Have you been able to read all our articles this month? If not, I’ll share the links so you can go back and check them out.

How to Choose the Right Editor

Choosing a Freelance Editor

Pros and Cons of Self-Editing

Which Editor Will You Choose?

Do You Need Help Editing Fiction? Try These Books

Meet Jennifer Uhlarik—Managing and Acquisitions Editor for Trailblazer Western Fiction

So How Do You Find an Editor?

Why Do I Need an Editor?

Editing. So very important. But let’s remember to first tell the story, and then edit. Too much editing at the beginning, unless you’re very experienced, will dilute the essence of what you’re creating. And that would be a great loss…

Join us in May to learn about the publishing market in 2019. We’re going to look at many phases of publishing with articles, interviews, and first-hand experiences. You won’t want to miss it.

Click to tweet: Editing. @InspiredPrompt Editing helps you lose wordiness to gain clarity. #editing #amwriting

Writing Prompt: Edit this short paragraph in the comments. Get creative…

John realized their relationship was over. He saw April with the other guy. He decided it had to be a date or why were they standing so close? His hand slammed the book he’d been reading. Wait. He could hear footsteps. Could it be April coming back to apologize or something?

Why Do I Need an Editor?

By Gail Johnson

Good morning, dear reader. I’m excited to have Dawn Kinzer with me this morning explaining why we need editors. Be sure to leave any question you have in the comments. Take it away, Dawn!

Gail: Why do I need an editor?

editingIf you’re a writer who has a great critique group, you may feel that you’ve already been given helpful feedback on your book. If you’ve been traditionally published, or hope to be, you’re aware that the publishing house will provide some editing for you.

Both are tremendous and very helpful. But, what if you’re a new author trying to impress an agent or a traditional publisher? With the rise of self-publishing and the competition it’s brought for sales, traditional publishers are more likely to choose “known” authors over unknowns—unless your book is pretty amazing. Even if you have a great story or concept, not all traditional publishers are willing or able to spend time and money cleaning up numerous errors. It’s much more efficient to select a book close to being publishable.

Traditionally published authors wanting more control on covers and content are turning to self-publishing. Even though they have experience, they may also need another pair of eyes on their manuscripts to make sure they’re putting out the best product feasible.

A freelance editor can point out holes in your story, suggest ways to improve the character arcs, clean up technical errors, fine-tune sentences, remove redundancies, bring clarity to information shared, and much more.

Why not give yourself the best chance you can to gain attention from the professionals—and even more importantly—readers? After all, don’t we want to give them the best experience possible?

Gail: What type of editing do I need?

checklist-2077019_1920The type of editing needed will depend on how rough the manuscript is at the time. Is it only in the developmental stage? Or is the book close to being polished and ready for a final proofreading? Your editor will be able assist you in that decision. Sometimes writers—especially those new to publishing—think all they need is a proofread when the book might require a complete overhaul.

Gail: Please share the different levels of editing.

Descriptions of editing services may vary slightly between people, so it’s important that you get clarification from any editors you’re considering hiring.

My definitions:

Developmental Editing

This type of editing is more “big-picture” focused. A developmental editor works closely with the author on a specific project from the initial concept, outline, or draft (or some combination of the three) through any number of subsequent drafts.

Critique

A critique will provide an assessment/review of your manuscript, noting its strengths and weaknesses. I point out specific problem areas and give general suggestions for improvement. A critique doesn’t include detailed advice on grammatical and technical issues.

Substantive (Content)

A substantive edit focuses on the content being presented in a logical, engaging, and professional fashion. I check for flow, structure, clarity of subject, and readability. In fiction, this edit also focuses on character development, dialogue, tags, beats, plot, subplot(s), theme, pacing, tension, voice, point of view, setting, the five senses, passive writing, showing vs. telling, and a satisfying story resolution.

Copyedit (line by line)

A copyedit includes the elements of a proofread, but it also focuses on style, continuity, word choice, clarity, redundancies, and clichés. I don’t change the meaning, but I look for ways to improve the writing. In nonfiction, I check to see if sources are cited for statistics and quotations. In fiction, I look for inconsistencies in point of view and tense.

Proofreading

A proofread will catch errors in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, basic grammar, inconsistent format, typos, and word usage (such as further vs. farther).

Gail: How can I find a reputable editor?

  1. Choose an editor who is knowledgeable about your genre and industry guidelines.

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Just as different techniques are used in writing each genre, different skills are needed for editing each one. In some ways, nonfiction is very different from working on fiction. If you’ve written a novel, please don’t hire an editor who strictly reads and edits nonfiction.

  1. Make sure the editor uses professional style guides.

The industry uses the following books as guidelines/rules when it comes to grammar, spelling, capitalization, hyphenating, punctuation, formatting, and almost anything else associated with publishing.

The Chicago Manual of Style

The Christian Writer’s Manual of Style

AP Stylebook (used in journalism)

The Merriam Webster Dictionary

  1. Visit the editor’s website.

You’ll get a feel for the editor’s personality, background, affiliations, and be able to read any endorsements from clients.

  1. Ask for referrals.

You may ask other authors for referrals, and you may also ask the editor if you can contact the editor’s clients.

  1. Contact professional organizations for writers.

If you belong to local groups for writers, ask other members if they’ve hired a freelance editor or if they know of someone who edits professionally.

I’m a member of the Northwest Christian Writers Association and American Christian Fiction Writers (ACFW). Both organizations include a list of freelance editors on their websites.

  1. Contact the Christian Editor Connection (CEC)

A great way to find an editor is to contact the Christian Editor Connection (CEC). I’m a member of this national organization of freelance editors and proofreaders. In order to be accepted into this group, editors must pass a series of proficiency tests.

By visiting this organization online (https://christianeditor.com/), you have the opportunity to connect with qualified editors.

You fill out a form and provide information on your project, your contact information, your preferred timeline, and how many editors you’d like to hear from (2-5 seems to be the average). That information is sent out to editors interested in working on that type of genre in fiction or nonfiction. They contact you through e-mail, and if you decide to hire someone, you and that editor work directly with each other. There’s no fee for submitting a request, and there’s no obligation to hire anyone.

Gail: What is the going rate for an editor?

Fees vary depending on the type of work requested and the editor’s experience.

Some editors charge by the word, some by the page, and others by the hour. Some also charge for time spent answering e-mails and phone calls.

But, the average rate can be anywhere from $25-$45 per hour.

However you’re charged, prepare to possibly spend $1,000 to over $2,000 to have a book edited (depending on the type of service and manuscript length).

You can check out the national average wages charged for various services by visiting the website for the National Freelancer’s Association (https://www.the-efa.org/rates/).

Gail: Dawn, thank you for joining us and answering our questions!

Click to Tweet: A freelance editor can point out holes in your story, suggest ways to improve the character arcs, clean up technical errors, fine-tune sentences, remove redundancies, bring clarity to information shared, and much more. #amwriting @InspiredPrompt

Meet author and editor, Dawn Kinzer

Dawn Kinzer is a freelance editor, and she launched Faithfully Write Editing in 2010. Experienced in fiction and nonfiction, she edits books, articles, devotions, and short stories—and her own work has been published in various devotionals and magazines. With a desire to encourage other Christian writers, she co-hosts and writes for the blog, Seriously Write. Sarah’s Smile is the first book in her historical romance series The Daughters of Riverton, Hope’s Design is the second, and Rebecca’s Song completes the trilogy.

A mother and grandmother, Dawn lives with her husband in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Favorite things include dark chocolate, good wine, strong coffee, the mountains, family time, and Masterpiece Theatre. You can connect and learn more about Dawn and her work by visiting: Author WebsiteDawn’s BlogGoodreadsFacebookPinterest, and Instagram.

Rebecca’s Song

The Daughters of Riverton Series, Book 3

A small-town school teacher who lost hope of having her own family.

A big-city railroad detective driven to capture his sister’s killer.

And three young orphans who need them both.

Rebecca Hoyt’s one constant was her dedication to her beloved students. Now, a rebellious child could cost her the job she loves. Without her teaching position, what would she do?

Detective Jesse Rand prides himself in protecting the people who ride the railroads. But, when his own sister and brother-in-law are killed by train robbers, the detective blames himself. Yet, another duty calls—he must venture to Riverton where his niece and nephews were left in the care of their beautiful and stubborn teacher, Rebecca Hoyt. They need to mourn and heal, but Jesse is determined to find his sister’s killers. Rebecca is willing to help care for the children, but she also fears getting too close to them—or their handsome uncle—knowing the day will come when he’ll take them back to Chicago.

Will Jesse and Rebecca find a way to open their hearts and work together? Or will they, along with the children, lose out on love?

Pros and Cons of Self-Editing

by: Shirley Crowder

Long before I began writing for anything other than my journal or notes for teaching Bible studies, I was helping friends by editing their writing. I enjoy helping people fine-tune their writing so that their ideas come across clearly to the readers of their work.

Once I began writing for others to read, I realized the importance of having someone else edit my writing. Following, I’ll share my perceptions of some pros and cons of self-editing. In my experience, each aspect I’ve considered can be a pro and a con.

PROS of Self-Editing

1.   You wrote the story and know what you want it to say.
This is your story to tell in your own words, using your own expressions. Sometimes an editor wants you to change your words.

2.   You can polish your ideas as you go.
As you write you can rewrite and correct spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors.

3.   You can save money.
Self-editing will cost your time but there will be no out-of-pocket money spent.

4.   You can use a good software program to help you check spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
There are many good editing programs, some are included with programs like Microsoft Word (which I use) and some are add-on programs that will help you with spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Some programs allow you to choose by which style manual (APA, Chicago, etc.) they will make recommendations.

CONS of Self-Editing

1.   You wrote the story (manuscript) and know what you want it to say.
Since you wrote the story and know precisely what you want it to say, you may well overlook mistakes in the manuscript because you are so familiar with the content that your eyes will read what you know you meant it to say, not what you actually wrote.

2.   You can polish your ideas as you go.
Editing and polishing as you go can often lead to your getting bogged down trying to figure out how to rewrite that one idea that is pertinent to the story. Self-editing as you go will not only slow down your process of getting your story committed to paper (or computer), it may well interrupt the flow of creative ideas as you make a conscious effort to focus on just one aspect of your story.

3.   You can save money.
Your goal is to have your manuscript consistent, easy to read, and have no glaring errors or inconsistencies, so, whatever monies you expend hiring an editor will help make your manuscript ready for publication.

4.   You can use a good software program to help you check spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
These software programs can be helpful, but you cannot always just take their suggestions. Sometimes they suggest a comma where one is not needed, or a spelling that is not the correct word you want to use.

I suggest you self-edit and hire an editor. Once your manuscript is completed, set it aside for several weeks and then go back through the manuscript to self-edit. Then I recommend you find a good editor to go through your manuscript and check for spelling, grammar, punctuation issues as well as inconsistencies. Even though it may be difficult for us to hear, it is very helpful to receive an honest critique of the manuscript.

Writing Prompt challenge – How would you edit the following? (Put your answer in the comments.)
One of the customs in Nigeria and many other parts of the world when a loved one dies is for mourners often paid professional mourners to be at the home of the deceased to wail and cry loudly and continually.

Click to Tweet: I suggest you self-edit and hire an editor. Even though it may be difficult for us to hear, it is very helpful to receive an honest critique of the manuscript. #amwriting #writerslife #editor