Research: The Inspired Prompt Way

Research. We’ve spent the month of March dissecting this topic from all angles. From how to start, to research on the road, and current events research, a way to gather information should be coming clear.

I’ve asked the Crew to share their go-to source when it comes to research. Here’s what they said:

Harriet Michael: As a Christian nonfiction writer who writes a lot of Biblical pieces—devotions and essays to a Biblical theme, my go-to resource is Bible Gateway where I can look up passages, do word searches, find commentaries, and find passages in all translations. Here is their link: https://www.biblegateway.com/

Jennifer Hallmark: Sometimes when I write, I just can’t think of the right word so I use an online thesaurus. Even if I don’t find what I need, it often gets my creativity flowing so I can move forward in my writing. Their link is http://www.thesaurus.com/

Kristy Horine: I find the Blue Letter Bible www.blueletterbible.org to be a great resource due to its interlinear concordance, cross references, language explanations, and access to commentaries. It has an app that is free that can be downloaded to your phone.  In addition, www.biblestudytools.com is helpful in the commentary area.

Another source is www.thoughtco.com. This is not a Christian-based resource, but it sure is fun for those strange and unusual questions like if brain cells regenerate, or the difference between racism and prejudice. It is based on the idea that we should be lifelong learners and seeks to teach just that. Plus, it has a really neat daily email you can sign up for. And, for numbers: www.barna.com and www.pewresearch.org

Betty Thomason Owens: I attended a class on researching at the Mid South Conference. The instructor gave us the Library of Congress website. It’s huge. You can find articles, photos, and lots of other interesting studies and stories and books. https://www.loc.gov/  I also love History.com  https://www.history.com/ and the Smithsonian.com https://www.smithsonianmag.com/.

Gail Johnson: I use the Bible, Webster’s dictionary, and the Strong’s Concordance. Also Bible Gateway and the online versions of the dictionary and thesaurus.

Bonita McCoy: I love  Biblehub.com because it gives you the verse in several translations. I use it for my Beautiful Pieces of Grace blog. Also the good old library for articles for the Inspired Prompt site and my Courageous Writers blog.

Fay Lamb: My research varies on what the subject happens to be. If it is medical, I will look up medical research on various sites, but I also look for journals of people who have undergone medical procedures. I also use slang dictionaries for slang for certain times. I even have a surfers’ slang dictionary.

Tammy Trail:  I tend to look for historical societies. There is a blog I like to catch up with too, Colonial Quills. Lots of historical information there for me. I use the Colonial Williamsburg website also. For writing related information, I love Seekerville.

Carlton Hughes:  Like others, my research varies depending on the subject. I’m mostly writing devotionals now, so usually I’m searching for a specific scripture on Bible Gateway. Blogs like Novel Rocket are good for general advice on fiction writing.

Shirley Crowder:  I use Blue Letter Bible — lots of commentaries, words studies, etc. https://www.blueletterbible.org/

Karen Jurgens: I use Google for whatever I need to know when I’m writing about Paris and other parts of the world. I study maps of the city, and I use reference books I’ve purchased while visiting. For example, I bought lots of historical books and maps of Cayman Island when I vacationed there a couple years ago. I always write about settings I know personally or have visited.

Cammi Woodall: Started in September of 1998, Google is the world’s largest search engine. You know how I know that? I googled it! When you can use your search engine name as a verb, you know you are doing something right. I love other sites like AskJeeves.com or Yahoo.com, but I always come back to Google. In one research session, l learned that the world’s oldest church is the Dura-Europos house church in Syria, arsenic poison will still show up in your fingernails 6 to 12 months after ingestion, and a ten-gallon hat really only holds three-quarters of a gallon. Who knew? Google did! And now I do, too.

Thank you, Inspired Prompt Crew! As you can see, there are research sites galore for the fiction and non-fiction writer. Do you have a go-to site that’s not listed above? In lieu of a writing prompt, we’re asking you to share that in the comments below…

Click to tweet: The Inspired Prompt Crew shares their go-to source when it comes to research for writers. #research #Google

Go, Dawgs!

by Gail Johnson

We are talking football this month! Favorite teams, colors, and tailgating recipes. Woo hoo! Are you a fan?

Sanford Stadium Wikicommons author Pruddle

Sanford Stadium, Wikicommons, photo: Pruddle

No one would call me a diehard fan. That would be my son, the one with all the red, white, and black memorabilia. But I do enjoy getting together with family and watching a college game now and then. For my family, that includes the Georgia Bulldogs. Here are a few stats for those unfamiliar with Georgia.

Sinkwich_bulldogs Wikicommons

Frank Sinkwich, Wikicommons

Inaugural season – 1892
UGA Fight Songs – Hail to Georgia, Glory, Alma Mater, Going Back, and Bulldog Marching Song
National Championships – 1927, 1942, 1946, 1968, 1980
Heisman Trophy Winners – Frank Sinkwich, Herschel Walker

And who can forget Coach Vince Dooley and announcer Larry Munson?

Tailgating Recipe

No matter the team playing or the fan watching, food is a must. Who can say no to a bowl of hot chili?

1 pound ground beef (85-15)
1/2 roll Jimmy Dean roll sausage
1 can petite diced tomatoes
1 can petite diced tomatoes
1 can Rotel
1 can black beans
1 can red beans
1 jar Paul Newman’s Fire Roasted Tomato and Garlic sauce (Trust me. It’s just tomato sauce)
Salt and Pepper
1 packet Chilo seasoning (Or use your own)
½ – ¾ cup water
1 bag nacho cheese Doritos
1 carton sour cream
1 jar deli-sliced Tamed jalapenos

Herschel_Walker

Herschel Walker, Wikicommons

Directions
Place beef, tomatoes, Rotel, beans sauce, salt and pepper, chili seasoning, and water into a pot and cook until beef is done. Let simmer until ready to serve. Can be cooked in a crockpot. Serve in individual bowls over crushed Dorito with a dollop of sour cream and jalapenos. Enjoy.

Let the games begin! Go, Dawgs!

 

Click to Tweet: “If you train hard, you’ll not only be hard, you’ll be hard to beat.” Herschel Walker #GoDawgs

Writing Prompt:
Unbelievable! Everyone in the stadium stood to their feet and waited for the referee…

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Trekking the Indie Route

By Gail Johnson

Are you thinking about becoming an indie author?

For those new to the term, indie is short for independent. But that doesn’t mean you have to go it alone. In fact, I suggest you don’t.

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Choosing the indie route can be scary when faced with all the decisions that must be made between the initial idea of the book and the final product. But there are a few things you can do to make the journey a lot easier.

 

Writing Groups

I suggest joining a writer’s organization. If you’re a Christian fiction writer, that would be the ACFW. For a small yearly fee, American Christian Fiction offers classes, conferences, and critique groups. A critique group will provide invaluable feedback during the writing process.

Friends

Writing is a lonely profession. We need friends, offline and online, to keep us balanced. Friends help make the journey an exciting adventure. They are irreplaceable treasures and wells of encouragement.

Editors

correcting-1870721_1280Love’em or dislike’em, editors have a purpose. A good editor can make a book better. You will not catch all your mistakes, but another pair of eyes will uncover the elusive typo. Guaranteed!

Ask for references. Talk to your friends or other authors. Working with someone can be a dream or a nightmare. Success depends on a good working relationship.

Media

Social media is a slippery slope. Too much of that and you lose writing time. Not enough and there’s no point. The point of media is interaction with others. Doing for others as you would have them do for you is good advice when thinking of media.

I want to share a few pointers I’ve learned in seven years of social media.  Don’t follow someone to get them to follow you, and then unfollow them. Not cool! And if you ask a question and someone answers it, respond. If you don’t, they won’t stay a follower.

Share their successes. There’s no reason to be jealous of another if their book comes out before yours. There are enough readers to go around. Be generous to promote them, and when your time comes, someone will do the same for you.

If you’re overwhelmed by your Twitter feed, may I suggest lists? Lists help separate your followers and those you like to interact with every day.

Readers

You gain readers by writing a good book. Hence all the above suggestions. Readers, like friends, are treasures. Treat them as such. You won’t regret it.

Blogging

Some people don’t like blogging. I do! My website gives me a chance to connect with friends and meet new ones every week. Blogging also helps with weekly word count. Whether you blog once a week or five times a week, make a schedule and stick with it.

My Journey

book-2224934_1280So, you see indie doesn’t necessarily mean independent. 🙂 It takes a tribe. I knew I couldn’t do everything. In the end, I hired editors, a back cover copywriter, and a cover designer. I did the formatting myself using a template which I purchased from a template designer. My book will be coming out later this year. Woohoo!

So, if you’ve been thinking about trekking the indie path but you’re afraid you can’t do it, take heart. There is a steep learning curve, but you CAN succeed as an indie author when you have friends to help you along the way.

Indie authors, what are your suggestions for newbies?

Click to Tweet: You can succeed as an #indie author when you have friends to help you along the way.

Writing Prompt

You have your manuscript, back cover copy, and your cover. Make a list of the things you need to do to make your book a success.

 

 

Saving Money With Lists

By Gail Johnson

Do you like finding new ways to save money? I do. I also like sharing ways to save money. So I’m enjoying this month’s theme!

For this post, I decided to list ways to save on several items rather than one. Let’s begin with school supplies.

School and Writing

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Whether you have kids in school or not, writers need school supplies. Or at least, this one does! I begin everything with pen and paper! I learned how to save money on used books when my children entered college. My son refused to buy new books when he could purchase used ones from Amazon. Moneycrashers.com offers great advice.

Clothes

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Who doesn’t like to find a bargain on a new outfit? ThePennyHoarder.com offers her advice on how to save when shopping for your next bargain. My favorite tips are one and seven.

Groceries

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Most of these ideas weren’t new to me. Others would take some discipline. Isn’t that what saving money is all about? See how many ideas you can keep from CashCowCouple.com

Vehicles

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My truck isn’t that old, but it isn’t new, either. I usually tend to my truck and make the appointment for hubby’s car. I use local shops to help local businesses and to have a friend when I’m in need! I thought this article might come in handy.  Debtroundup.com offers suggestions when looking for a tune-up.

Books

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I added this last bit of information because I read one article on how to save money and his suggestion was to eliminate books! What?! Uh, no. I would suggest taking advantage of the offers on your device’s plan. With Kindle, you can get many books for free. Another way to save money on books is not to press the 1-click button too often! 😉 Check out TheHappyHouseWife.com for more ideas.

Do you have any ideas to add? If so, I’d love to hear them. Please leave your tip in the comment section to help others in their quest to save money.

Click to tweet: I’ve listed ways to save on several items rather than one.

Writing Prompts

Sally eyed the purple dress in the window. With her digital coupon and the 10% off sale, she could afford the…

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Memorable Families

By Gail Johnson

Good morning, fellow-writers and readers! This month’s theme is family and children.

And why not? For years, we have enjoyed stories about families. Some of my favorites are Little House on the Prairie, Anne of Green Gables, The Waltons, Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, and The Fighting Sullivans.

Do you have a family in your story? If not, you should think about adding one. Relatives make such interesting additions to a tale. Parents and siblings can be comical, irritating, sacrificial, or even murderous. As supporting characters, they usually stand in the shadows, far from the limelight until a remark or reaction catches our eye. At that moment, we are captivated and they are forever etched in our minds. Memorable.

Rex_Whistler_-_Pride_and_Prejudice_2

Rex Whistler [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

For instance, ask anyone about Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and they can tell you something about each character although the story is about Elizabeth and Darcy. Who doesn’t remember the sisters–Jane, Mary, Lydia, and Kitty? Or poor Mr. Collins? And how could anyone forget Mrs. Bennet?

 

Thomson-PP03_(recadrage)

By Hugh Thomson (1860-1920) (Lilly Library, Indiana University) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

“She was a woman of mean understanding, little information, and uncertain temper. When she was discontented, she fancied herself nervous. The business of life was to get her daughters married; its solace was visiting and news.” Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

 

Love her or hate her, you can’t ignore Mrs. Bennet! Every time I read the book or watch the movie, she reminds me of a clucking hen gathering her uncooperative, strong-willed chicks. She doesn’t care about “the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.” She’s content with being a mother. She has one objective: getting her daughters married and saving them from poverty. Period. Is she a rude woman? Certainly. Nosey? Definitely. Loving? Unquestionably, in her own way. Is she perfect? Hardly. And that’s the beauty of it. All her faults are what makes her memorable.

Jane Austen’s family isn’t perfect. Her characters make good and bad choices. They laugh, cry, and argue.  But eventually, they come together to help each other and in the end, all is well just like a family should be. Nothing like a happy ending!

Now it’s your turn. Think about one of your favorite families. What stands out in your mind? Were they good all the time? Were they bad all the time? I would suggest they were a mixture of the two. Think about how you can take those memorable traits and add them to your story? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Click to tweet: Do you have a family in your story?

Writing Prompt: Take one supporting character from your favorite family and build a story around them.