3 Questions Wednesday with Denise Weimer

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday! Today Inspired Prompt welcomes author and publisher, Denise Weimer! Thanks for taking the time to join us.

First question:
Who is your favorite author?

Denise: I have to admit, I struggle with favorites. I do better with types. I adore the writing of authors who are able to place me in edge-of-my-seat awe. I want to admire the characters even as I relate to them. I want to feel as they do. I want to see and smell and hear as they do. I want to hold my breath as they encounter places and challenges outside their comfort zones.

Because of this, I also admit to a penchant for frontier historical romance. It can be any frontier in any time period—just take me with your characters to the edge of what’s known and nudge me beyond. Meanwhile, making the page crackle with attraction between the hero and heroine. When there are almost insurmountable obstacles, it’s all the sweeter when the two at last come together. I’ve particularly enjoyed the novels of Laura Frantz, Francine Rivers, Michelle Griep, and Shannon McNear.

Love it, I’m on the edge with the anticipation you’ve described.  Next question…
If you could write about anyone or anything fiction/nonfiction who or what would you write about?

Denise: I’ve written about most of the things I originally wanted to write about as a starry-eyed twenty-year-old. My first desire was to pen a sweeping saga set in North Georgia during the mid-1800s, and I did that with my Georgia Gold Series. I incorporated deep spiritual truths time-slip-style into The Restoration Trilogy. And the urge I’d had to explore the Revolutionary War Battle of Kettle Creek in Georgia was captured in Across Three Autumns of The Backcountry Brides Collection. I’ve ventured into contemporary romance and romantic suspense with Fall Flip and my two spring 2020 releases, Traces and Spring Splash—in which I even got to encapsulate experience from my years as a swim mom. I’ve also delved into the rich Cherokee history of my state which has always held a fascination for me with The Witness Tree and a novel currently looking for a publishing home. Now I wait for whatever God prompts me to write or something for which He opens a door. In everything, my goal is to write whatever story He lays on my heart.

Wow, sounds like you’ve stayed focused on your goals for writing about different times in history. Last question: If you could spend time with a character from your book or another book whom would it be? And what would you do during that day?

Denise: I would walk the streets of Old Salem, North Carolina, with Clarissa Vogler Kliest, my heroine in The Witness Tree. I’d love to hear from her personally about life in that Williamsburg-like town in 1805, life as a Moravian lady who entered into a marriage of convenience arranged by the lot. Curious about what the lot was? You can guess where to begin Clarissa’s story?

I’m intrigued. There are many times I want to crawl inside the book and fully experience the setting, and get to know the characters as friends. Thanks for stopping by.

Click to tweet: Now I wait for whatever God prompts me to write or something for which He opens a door. In everything, my goal is to write whatever story He lays on my heart.

Denise Weimer is offering to give away a book! Comment on this post that you would like to be included in the drawing and any other comment. We will draw a name on Wednesday, November 13th.


Fall Flip:

The tragic death of Shelby Dodson’s husband—her partner in a successful Home Network house flipping business—stole love, status, and career. Now a bungalow redesign thrusts Shelby into the company of a new contractor. Scott Matthews remembers high-and-mighty Shelby from high school, and her prissy, contemporary style goes against his down-to-earth grain. When the house reveals a mystery, will its dark secrets—and their own mistakes—cost a second chance at love?

The Witness Tree:
Past betrayal has turned John Kliest’s passion to his work as a builder and surveyor in the Moravian town of Salem, North Carolina. Now, to satisfy the elders’ edict and fulfill his mission in Cherokee Territory, he needs a bride. But the one woman qualified to record the Cherokee language longs for a future with his younger brother.

Clarissa Vogler’s dream of a life with Daniel Kliest is shattered when she is chosen by lot to marry his older brother and venture into the uncharted frontier. Can she learn to love this stoic man who is now her husband? Her survival hinges on being able to trust him—but they both harbor secrets.


Denise Weimer writes historical and contemporary romance and romantic suspense set in her home state of Georgia. She’s authored over nine novels and a number of novellas. As a managing editor at Smitten Historical Romance and Heritage Beacon Fiction, Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas, she also helps others reach their publishing dreams. A wife and mother of two daughters, Denise always pauses for coffee, chocolate, and old houses.

1st Saturday Extra: It’s More Than Sales

By Sandra Ardoin

Phyllis Keels

When I was first asked to share about an author who made an impact on me, several came to mind. I wasn’t sure which person to choose.

Did I write about how Dee Henderson introduced me to the O’Malleys and taught me that Christian fiction can be both exciting, suspenseful, and heart-touching?

Did I write about becoming absorbed by Tamara Alexander’s gentle writing voice and how it made me long to write like her? Did I mention how she brought her research to life through story and all I learned of those who “lived” in a previous century?

Did I discuss the many critique partners, editors, and mentors who have helped me to see where I need to improve my writing and what works or doesn’t?

In the end, I’ve chosen to tell you about my friend, Phyllis Keels. Phyllis and I went to the same church and discovered we both had a love for writing. I’d been looking for a local Christian critique group to attend and hadn’t found one, so she and I decided we would become our own group—or duo.

When we were both pretty green in the ways of novel writing, we met at the library in a tiny tutoring room and shared our stories with the intention of teaching one another. As with most critique partners, she had special talents and I had others.

For Phyllis, I emphasized the need to put her characters through the wringer. She wanted them to look perfect, be perfect, and always prevail. You see, like so many authors and readers, Phyllis considered her characters as friends, and she hated making them suffer as much as she hated seeing real friends suffer.

As for me, she’d say, “I want to see the poetry.” She wanted to read the beauty of description in my stories, not “just the facts, ma’am.” So, I learned how to use more similes and metaphors. I learned how to let a train’s engine drag “its cars down the track like a caterpillar dragging its body along a tree limb.”

We had fun in those hours and, one night, attracted too much attention. I think I was in elementary school the last time I’d been shushed by a librarian. Of course, that brought on more giggles.

Phyllis’s talent for whimsical drawings were showcased when she illustrated a couple of children’s books. She wrote Emma and the Paper especially for her dad. She used her fur baby, Emma, as the main character in the story. Her charming watercolors also illustrated Kimberly Rae’s book When I’m With Jesus: For Any Child with a Loved One in Heaven.

And Phyllis was a fount of spiritual knowledge, willing to share it with whomever crossed her path. She learned much of it from her mama and daddy. In fact, several times, she wrote the narrative for the church choir’s Christmas and Easter programs.

In my opinion, Phyllis’s greatest talent rested in non-fiction and her ability to share the gospel through her blog posts and devotions. God used her posts to show His love to all readers, but especially those in the midst of grief. It became her ministry after experiencing her own tragedy. At book selling events, I’d see her sympathize and empathize with people who were going through tough times, often gifting them one of her books if she felt it might help.

In Phyllis Keels, I saw the value of poetry, following God’s will, and viewing a reader as more than a customer. So, with this post, I hope I’ve honored my friend on the cusp of the one-year anniversary of her presence with the Lord where she now rejoices with her father, daughter, and sister.

Phyllis’s books remain on Amazon. If you need encouragement, please check them out.

Click to tweet: How an author inspired me. Phyllis’s greatest talent rested in non-fiction and her ability to share the gospel through her blog posts and devotions. #faith #amreading


Sandra Ardoin engages readers with page-turning stories of love and faith. She’s the author of the heartwarming novella, The Yuletide Angel and the award-winning novel, A Reluctant Melody. Rarely out of reach of a book, she’s also an armchair sports enthusiast, country music listener, and seldom says no to eating out.

Visit her at http://www.sandraardoin.com. Subscribe to receive updates and specials. Connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Pinterest, and BookBub.


A Reluctant Melody

Kit Barnes’ drinking ruined more lives than his own. Now sober, he wants to make amends by opening a mission for drunkards. The most suitable location belongs to Joanna Cranston Stewart, a love from his sordid past and the one person he hurt the most.

A pariah among her peers, Joanna is all too eager to sell her property and flee the rumors that she sent her late husband to an early grave. But she will let the gossips talk and the walls of her rundown property crumble around her before she’ll allow Kit back into her life. 

When a blackmailer threatens to reveal her long-held secret, she must choose between trusting Kit or seeing her best friend trapped in an abusive marriage. 

Will Joanna risk another betrayal? Or will she find a way through the pain of the past to love and trust again?

3 Questions Wednesday with Ada Brownell

Welcome back to 3 Questions Wednesday, author and newspaper woman, Ada Brownell.

Great deal alert! Ada’s latest novel, Peach Blossom Rancher, is on sale for 99 cents tomorrow, Oct. 19, here: http://ow.ly/4ETL302QdhW

Now that you know how to buy the book, let’s get to the first question:

What inspires you?

Ada:  A person with an active imagination and a workaholic personality finds ideas everywhere. When I see an interesting person, somebody with an unusual quality about them, I get inspired to create a character like him. The experiences my parents, siblings and other relatives used to tell about inspired me and I wrote articles, stories and books. I get inspired in church, and sometimes take notes and end up with an article of my own, or ghostwrite with the speaker. The truths I find in God’s Word give me a reason to write. When I can’t sleep I get ideas for new endeavors, or work out the kinks in something in progress.

I sometimes take notes at church too. 🙂 God is amazing!

Next question is a bit of fun–

You’re a new addition to the crayon box. What color would you be and why?

Ada:  I’d rather be the color of cream, but I admit I’m red. It’s in my DNA. I am a redhead, today out of bottle, but I was born with an auburn top, and the blonde in it only shined light on the brilliance. Especially in my youth, I blushed easily. I have a temper that the Lord has worked on for years, but somehow my grit and the fire God put in me is behind my success as a writer and newspaper woman.

Good choice. Red is the color of fire and blood, so it is associated with energy, war, danger, strength, power, determination as well as passion, desire, and love…

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Ada: I wanted to be a secretary. Yet, I had experience leading youth and teaching Sunday school so I expected I could combine that with being a secretary. As a youth leader at age 15, I started selling ideas for youth services to a youth magazine. I expanded to articles. Then I enrolled in a Christian writers’ course, and the instructor suggested I write for newspapers to get experience. After I married, I became a correspondent in a little town and when we moved I got a job as a staff reporter. I was hired by The Pueblo Chieftain because of the stack of published Christian articles I had. I later earned my bachelor’s degree in mass communications.

 What an interesting road to take on your writing journey. Ada, thanks so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to answer our 3 Questions.

Readers, Ada is offering a Kindle copy of Peach Blossom Rancher, to one blessed reader. Just leave a comment in the comments section below to be entered to win.

Click to tweet: Meet author and newspaper woman, Ada Brownell. #WriterWednesday #3QuestionsWednesday

Here’s more information about the book:


Peach Blossom Rancher

Sequel to The Lady Fugitive, second in Peaches and Dreams series

A handsome young man with a ranch in ruin and a brilliant doctor confined to an insane asylum because of one seizure. Yet their lives intersect. How will they achieve their dreams?

John Lincoln Parks yearns for a wife to help make the ranch all it should be after his uncle, a judge, ravaged it before he was murdered. John has his eye on his sister Jenny’s elegant matron of honor, Valerie MacDougal, a young widow. But Valerie, a law school graduate, returns to Boston to live since her little son was born. John and Valerie write, he’s kissed her a few times, but while in Boston Valerie and one of her father’s law partners try to get three patients wrongfully judged as insane out of the Boston asylum.

Will John marry Valerie or Edwina Jorgenson, the feisty rancher-neighbor who has been in love with John since they were in grade school? Edwina’s father is in a wheelchair and she’s taking care of their ranch. John tries to help and protect this neighbor who has a Peeping Tom whose bootprints are like the person’s who dumped a body in John’s barn. But John and Edwina fuss at one another constantly. Will John even marry, or be hanged for the murder?

Here’s a comment from Deirdre Lockhart at Brilliant Cut Editing: “By the way, I want Polly to live near me. Not just for the food, which made my mouth water, but she made my spirit sing too. I feel my absolute faith a little stronger after living with her and Abe this week.”

Buy Peach blossom rancher here: http://ow.ly/4ETL302QdhW


 Ada Brownell’s latest novel is Peach Blossom Rancher and on sale for .99 Oct. 19 here: http://ow.ly/4ETL302QdhW

A handsome young man inherits a ranch in ruin and a brilliant doctor is confined to an insane asylum because of one seizure. Yet their lives intersect.

Angle and light make all the difference in Ada Brownell’s writing. A different angle and light will illuminate important facts for a newspaper story, create interesting characters for a novel, or important truths for a non-fiction inspirational article or book. The author’s perspective, discovered by years of praying for wisdom, hearing the Word and studying Scripture, is best described by her brand, “Stick-to-Your-Soul Encouragement.”

3 Questions Wednesday with Dawn Kinzer

Welcome to 3 Questions Wednesday on Thursday!

It’s standing room only at 3 Questions Wednesday! Dealing with a failed hard drive has left me scrambling to retrieve everything so I’m catching up our latest interview with a Thursday post.

Today we hear from another wonderful author, Dawn Kinzer. I’m so excited to see how she will answer our 3 Questions. So without further ado–

Let’s get to the first question:

What inspires you?

Dawn: Well-written books, music, movies, paintings, and theater all inspire—anything under the “arts” umbrella has potential to move me. I often draw inspiration from just hanging out with nature and God while being silent. People who face challenges with courage and optimism motivate me to be better. They all affect my writing and my life.

There’s nothing better than a well-written book. 🙂

You’re a new addition to the crayon box. What color would you be and why?

Dawn: Lovely Lilac because lilacs are my favorite flower and the color is peaceful—at least I think it’s soothing. I’ve been told I’m often the calm in the midst of craziness. I’d also be a scented crayon because I love the smell of those blooms.

I like the idea of a lilac scented crayon…last question.

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Dawn: When I was very young, I wanted to be a dancer. Didn’t most little girls? But, from the start of junior high through high school, I wanted to be a medical missionary. There are a variety of reasons why that didn’t come to fruition, but needless to say, God had other plans. However, he’s used my gifts to minister in other ways through the years. God always knows best!

That’s a wonderful to look at it. Thanks so much, Dawn, for joining us today!

 Dawn has written another great book, Sarah’s Smile, she released a while back and she is willing to give away a signed copy. 

Leave a comment for a chance to win!


Sarah’s Smile

Romance. Heartbreak. Scandal. Secrets. Second Chances.

In 1902, Sarah McCall is waiting to leave for the mission field when the man she once loved steps back into her life. Abandoned as a child by her mother and gambler father, she strives to overcome a tarnished history she didn’t create and a heartbreak she can’t forget.

Peter Caswell returns to his Wisconsin hometown a pastor, dedicated to his four-year-old daughter and new congregation. But no matter how hard he tries to move on with his life, he can’t forgive himself for his wife’s death.

When Sarah learns that Peter is returning to Riverton, the letter giving her departure date for Africa can’t come soon enough for her. They were best friends—she loved him and supported his dreams—but he married another and broke her heart. Although ten years have passed since he left Riverton, Peter hopes Sarah still cares enough to give him a second chance. But a charming newcomer pursues her affections—and Sarah’s childhood nemesis manipulates her way into Peter’s life. Will Sarah and Peter find their way to forgiveness and each other, or will past mistakes make a life together impossible?

Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, Paperback: http://amzn.to/2iK7nN0


Dawn Kinzer writes fiction because she believes in the power of story to comfort, challenge, and inspire. Her work has been published in the Christian Fiction Online Magazine, Backyard Friends magazine, The One Year Life Verse Devotional, A Joyful Heart: Experiencing the Light of His Love, and featured on the radio ministry, The Heartbeat of the Home.

Dawn’s historical romance series, The Daughters of Riverton, takes place in the early 1900s. The setting and some of the characters were inspired by her rural Wisconsin hometown. Sarah’s Smile is the first story in the series, and Hope’s Design is the second. A third novel, Rebecca’s Song, will be released later in 2017.

A mother and grandmother, Dawn lives with her husband in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. Favorite things include dark chocolate, cinnamon, popcorn, strong coffee, good wine, the mountains, family time, and Masterpiece Theatre.

Readers can find her at www.dawnkinzer.com.

Blog – Inspiration, Dreams & Purpose:  www.dawnkinzer.blogspot.com

Goodreads:  www.goodreads.com/author/show/15811132.Dawn_Kinzer

Facebook:  www.facebook.com/dawn.kinzer.9

Pinterest:  www.pinterest.com/dkinzer9/boards

Instagram:   www.instagram.com/dawnkinzer

Google+:  https://plus.google.com/+DawnKinzer

Amazon Author Page:  http://amzn.to/2jdkua3

3 Questions Wednesday with Jo Huddleston

Happy Wednesday! Jo Huddleston is a multi-published author of books, articles, and short stories and our guest.  She’s offered to give away an eBook copy of With Good Intentions. So read on and see how you can win…(There’s also a short excerpt of her book at the end of the interview)

First Question:

What inspires you?

Jo: Along the way, I’ve known people who have inspired me with their principles and work ethics. Four come to mind—a seventh grade teacher, my high school principal, an employer, and an editor. The messages in books by Andy Andrews have inspired me. However, if this question asks what inspires me to write, then my answer would be this: What writing ability I have comes from God and I must be the best steward of that gift that I can be. How could I not write?

A good question to ponder. Now…

You’re a new addition to the crayon box. What color would you be and why?

Jo: I would be cobalt blue. That is my favorite color in my clothes and in any room in my home. I don’t favor beige and blending in, but as an adult prefer an electric cobalt blue.

How true. We should all be ourselves. 🙂

As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?

Jo: A librarian. In the seventh grade, a teacher assigned me to work in the school library, helping the librarian there. I had always loved everything about attending school. Now I had a new world to discover—a room full of books. It was many years later that I realized I had grown into an adult who treasured being organized and loved to read, both probably as an extension of my days working in that school library.

Working in a library would be a dream job. Thanks so much for dropping by!

Make sure and leave a comment if you’d like to be entered in the giveaway of With Good Intentions.


With Good Intentions

A sweet romance spiced with deception, set in 1959.

Jean Stewart and her mama stand firm to protect their family business from a big-city developer’s takeover. Oscar Wainworth sends his son William to convince the ladies to sell their property. William has an instant attraction to Jean, believes he shouldn’t be the one to discuss the sale with the Stewarts, and gives them a fake name. If they know he’s a Wainworth, he’s likely to find himself out on the sidewalk.

One lie leads to another until William may have dug a hole too deep to escape. By stealth he learns that Jean can’t associate with anyone who is dishonest. To win Jean’s love, William must convince her that his lies flowed from good intentions.

 Book’s Purchase Link: http://amzn.to/2lTR7LF


Jo Huddleston is a multi-published author of books, articles, and short stories. Novels in her West Virginia Mountains series, her Caney Creek series, and her standalone novel, Tidewater Summer, are sweet Southern historical romances. Jo is a member of ACFW and the Literary Hall of Fame at Lincoln Memorial University (TN). Learn more at www.johuddleston.com where you can read first chapters of her novels and novellas and also sign up for her mailing list.

Links to Huddleston Online:

Website and blog (Read novel first chapters here): http://www.johuddleston.com

Sign up for Jo’s mailing list: http://bit.ly/1ZFaZwG

Amazon author page: http://amzn.to/2cfSroU

Facebook author page: http://bit.ly/2aqFEeT

Facebook personal page: http://on.fb.me/1Ubic69

Goodreads: http://bit.ly/1QAPtFv

Inspirational blog: http://bit.ly/2gttKVr

BookBub Profile: http://bit.ly/2liB0G3


With Good Intentions

Chapter 1

October 1959—Birmingham, Alabama

William Wainworth shifted in his chair, stretched his long legs beneath the massive conference table, and braced for the impending reprimand from the CEO. This regular Monday morning meeting of Wainworth Development sales staff had gone on longer than he’d expected.

He would loosen his necktie but doing so would violate the expectations Wainworth’s CEO held for his male employees: wear a coat and tie when representing Wainworth Development. His daddy being the CEO of Wainworth Development, William had that rule ingrained in him from an early age.

Among other stellar traits, his daddy dressed immaculately, and he expected his workforce to follow his example. His appearance had favorably impressed many clients who sat with him in his Birmingham office. Every weekday, he never ventured outside his home without the requisite coat and necktie. William had never seen him wear wrinkled pants or curled-up shirt collars.

Now, Oscar Wainworth stood tall, slender, and good-looking between the head of the table and an easel, his index finger tapping on a sketch positioned there. William moved his attention from his daddy to the sketch, a street-level drawing of storefronts along a sidewalk in Conroy, Alabama.

Wainworth Development sought to purchase that entire block of businesses, demolish the buildings, and replace them with an apartment complex having a bookstore on the first floor. Sitting across the street from a growing college, the location proved ideal for Wainworth’s purpose.

The building plans had received the city’s approval. Wainworth representatives had successfully gained signatures on real estate contracts to acquire all the properties except one. The smallest business on the block refused to sell, despite repeated overtures from Wainworth Development.

Oscar Wainworth faced the dozen or so men seated around the table in chairs upholstered in rich, brown leather. He put his palms on the gleaming tabletop and leaned forward. “Gentlemen, this one small store is the monkey wrench in this whole deal. We’ve bought up all the properties on the block, yet here’s this little hole-in-the-wall ice cream shop smack-dab in the middle that you’ve not convinced to sell. Why is that? Why this one store?”