Time to Write with Carlton & Kristy

Carlton Hughes–

Time to write? An interesting phenomenon I haven’t figured out.

My day job is teaching, and I currently teach at three different sites each week, in addition to completing community service and internal service. I serve my church as a children’s pastor, and I am a year-round volunteer with Operation Christmas Child. I am married and have two nearly-grown sons and lots of cats (we are the stray magnet in the neighborhood).

As if that isn’t enough, I am called to be a writer. Many times I’ll plan a day of writing, and here’s how that usually goes:

  • Wake up, do my devotional reading.
  • Quick check of social media—in case I have an important message, of course.
  • Eat breakfast (Can’t write on an empty stomach, can I?)
  • Sit down with my computer, open a Word file.
  • Type a title.
  • Remember there’s an I Love Lucy marathon on, watch an episode or three to jump-start my creativity.
  • Check episode guides online to get information about what I am watching.
  • Back to my computer, type a couple of sentences.
  • Realize I’m hungry, go eat lunch (Need strength for writing!).
  • Come back to my computer, another quick check of social media.
  • Watch a cat video.
  • Return to my computer, type another sentence or two.
  • Decide that’s enough, I’m tired, turn on the latest football or basketball game.

Does your adult ADHD kick in when you try to write? I have learned I make more time to write when I have a deadline. With that hanging over my head, I’ll leave behind the sitcoms, ball games, and social media sites to write.

Let’s open our computers and write! Oh, wait, another cat video . . .


Carlton Hughes

Carlton Hughes wears many hats: husband, father, college professor, children’s pastor, writer. He is a professor of communication at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College and the children’s pastor at Lynch Church of God. He and his wife Kathy have two sons, Noah and Ethan. You’ll find his tongue in his cheek as he contributes humorous inspirational pieces to two blogs and writes for devotions for publication.

 


Kristy Horine – A Peculiar Reveille

One of them started whining at 4:50 a.m. The other joined in with that short, sharp arf! a few minutes later.

I did ask for help with getting up at 5 a.m. to write, didn’t I?

Why, yes. Yes, I did. I asked and God answered.

For several months now, the dogs have sounded off like clockwork. The beauty of this wake-up call is that the dogs don’t have a snooze button I can smack. I actually have to get out of bed, put on a robe, my coat, and my shoes. I must be alert enough to deal with leashes, and then walk in the cold dark and wait while the pooches find that perfect place to … well, you know. By the time I get back into the house, I am completely awake and ready to write.

A peculiar, persistent reveille. Just what I needed. Just when I needed it.


Kristy Horine is a Kentucky writer: freelance journalist by trade; creative by God’s grace. Kristy writes a little bit of everything including poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction. She makes her life in Bourbon County with her husband and is mother to four children. Her professional and creative work has been published in newspapers, magazines and anthologies in Kentucky and beyond. She is the founder of 3rd Letter Christian Writers in Lexington, Kentucky and is a contributing blogger at www.inspiredprompt.com.  Read more of her work at: www.writeonereallife.fistbump.press, and http://www.kentuckymonthly.com/blogs/a-kentuckian-in-paris or follow her on Twitter at @Kwriteone.


[Click to Tweet] Does your adult ADHD kick in when you try to write? Time to Write with Carlton & Kristy via @InspiredPrompt #amwriting #WriteTip

Writing Prompt: Choose one of the three photos above (cat, dogs, or bugler) and come up with a couple of intriguing questions to start a story.

Time to Write with Fay & Jennifer

Finding time to write is our topic of conversation this month and today’s guests are author Fay Lamb, and author and Inspired Prompt co-founder, Jennifer Hallmark.

Fay Lamb

The art of time management has always been a plague for me because I always have five or six balls in the air, and sitting down for an extended period of time has never been my style—except when writing. Yet I still struggle with consistent word count. On occasion, I have been able to pound out my word count for about two days in a row.

Many writers preach that the only way to get the job done is to firmly place the derriere on a chair, hands on a computer or holding a pen, and pounding out an exact number of words per day. Hemingway did it. He even managed to stop daily at a place he found exciting, the act giving him something to look forward to each day. As a seat of the pants author, I want to find out what’s going to happen. No stopping for me. Robert Benson pens exactly 600 words per day. No more. No less. I write more than 600 words in a Facebook post in ten minutes. Too easy.

Nothing in life is more enjoyable to me than writing. My mind takes a vacation into its own little world, and I’d love to declare that I write 1,500 words every single day. Even though the goal is clearly a pipe dream, I still hold to the illusion that I need to get those words accomplished, because it creates an urgent need for me to get busy, especially as the days without a word count rack up. When I finally sit down, derriere firmly placed in chair, hands on keyboard, I churn out at least 1,500 words, but most days, the count is a 6,000 to 10,000 word vacation.


Fay Lamb is the only daughter of a rebel genius father and a hard-working, tow-the-line mom. She is not only a fifth-generation Floridian, she has lived her life in Titusville, where her grandmother was born in 1899.
Since an early age, storytelling has been Fay’s greatest desire. She seeks to create memorable characters that touch her readers’ heart. She says of her writing, “If I can’t laugh or cry at the words written on the pages of my manuscript, the story is not ready for the reader.” Fay writes in various genres, including romance, romantic suspense, and contemporary fiction.


Jennifer Hallmark

Finding time to write? Wow. You’ve come to the wrong person. Well, maybe not. I can dial in my analytical side at any time it seems and make time to produce articles, blog posts, anything concerning the business/non-fiction side of writing.

Fiction is more of a struggle. When I’m working out of the creative side, I need focus. Peace. No distractions. Time which, around my home, is hard to find during this season of my life.

I’ve learned two things that help when I just can’t find the time:

  • Write away from home. I never thought I could write at a coffee shop or at a bookstore but low and behold, with home being a bit chaotic, I can. I seem to be able to dial out strangers and crowd noises better than the familiar sounds at my house.
  • I turn to handwriting. I often use the notebook by my bed to write out a scene or even a thought that might go in a book. Sometimes I’m riding in the car, at the doctor’s office, or even at church when inspiration strikes and I find a sticky note and jot it down. Writing like this always translates into time well-spent.

Find out what works for you. Guard your writing time well even if you don’t have deadlines and one day you probably will. 😊


Jennifer Hallmark  

I love writing, reading, and learning. 🙂

But I am so much more: Wife, Mother, Mamaw, friend and family to many,  cookie baker, LOTR marathon watcher, greeting card sender, church bulletin maker, day trip with Hubby and friends taker, snowman and Golden Age of Detective book collector.

Welcome to my world!


[Click to Tweet] “Hemingway…even managed to stop daily at a place he found exciting, the act giving him something to look forward to each day.”–Fay Lamb @FayLamb via @InspiredPrompt #amwriting #AskAuthor #Schedule

FUN Writing Prompt! Schedule five minutes by setting an alarm on your phone (or other timing device). Write everything that pops into your mind until the alarm stops you. GO! (Have Fun!) Extra: If you wrote something especially funny or interesting, share it in the comments. We love hearing from our readers.

Closing Comments on Indie Publishing

August is at an end. Can you believe it? Looking back over the month, we’ve shared our stories, interviews, comments, and suggestions about Indie publishing. If you’ve read our posts this month, tell me, what stands out to you? What helped you most? Inspired you?


To wrap up the month, we’d like to hear from you—our readers. Share a short comment about your own “Indie” journey, tell us what you liked best from our posts, or if you still have questions, ask us. If we don’t know the answer, we’ll find out for you.

Our greatest desire is to be of help to you along your writing journey. Be encouraged to prayerfully consider your next steps. Your dreams are important, so don’t rush it, and don’t cut too many corners.
Writing Prompt: Just for Fun – Write a haiku about the above photo. Don’t know how? Here’s a helpful post from Creative Writing Now: How to Write a Haiku

Throughout the month of September, we’re going to talk about “Working with the Industry.” I hope you’ll join us.

Click to Tweet:  To Indie publish or not? Your dreams are important, so don’t rush it, and don’t cut too many corners from Betty Owens – @batowens via @InspiredPrompt #IndieAuthors #SelfPub

Twenty Years of Grandma Status

by Betty Thomason Owens

Bill Clinton was the POTUS in 1997.

In China, they slaughtered 1.25 million chickens due to the bird flu. Tony Blair was Prime Minister in the UK, and Princess Diana was killed in a car crash.

For me, the fall of 1997 launched a new era, as I became a grandmother for the first time. My granddaughter was two when she called me grandma, and I thought that was truly the most beautiful title in the world.

The next two decades would bring five more granddaughters and two grandsons into the family. The first time they call me grandma still warms my heart.

Another life-changing event happened in the last twenty years. I began my publishing journey. I never set out to write books. If someone had told me I’d one day be an author, I would’ve laughed. Uproariously.

If the publishing industry had remained as it was two or three decades back, I may not be a published author today. I started out as an Indie writer.

Kindle and the entire e-book industry changed the publishing world—turned it upside down. Publishing exploded, as it became more accessible to the average, or not-so-average writer. It became a race. Some authors tried to write really fast to keep up with their readers’ demands. The more they wrote, the more they sold. Write fast. Sell ‘em while they’re hot.

But not everyone. Those were mostly romance writers. I started out writing inspirational fantasy adventure. They sold, but not like romance. Romance sells like IHOP pancakes. Stacks and stacks. All you can eat. Really good romance, mixed with suspense, will fly off the e-shelves.

Well, I’ve swerved off the twenty-year topic here. You can see what an intriguing subject Indie publishing is.

So, back to me, and my journey. After publishing those two fantasy books, my historical fiction novel was picked up by a small publisher. Then I sold another historical fiction to the same publisher, so I now have two series going on. Currently, I’m finishing up the first series, book number seven for me. I have almost as many books as grandchildren.

The name “author” feels pretty good. “Published author” sounds even better, and “award-winning author” (thank you, Grace Awards), is the thrill of a lifetime. But I think the name Grandma is still my personal favorite. Listing published book titles is fun, and claiming an award is a great honor, but naming all my grands and trying to remember their ages is the most fun of all. And perhaps the greatest challenge.

CLICK TO TWEET: Grandma and published #author: both are titles I’ve earned in the last #20years.

Writing Prompt: Take a look at the picture below. What comes to mind? Does it inspire you? Write a caption, or start a story, using this photo as inspiration.

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Gathered Fragments

by Harriet E. Michael

And when they had eaten their fill, he told his disciples, “Gather up the leftover fragments, that nothing may be lost.” John 6:12 (ESV)

I first noticed this verse in an old handwritten book my father has on his shelf. It was handed down to him by his mother who got it from her mother. It appears to be an old journal of some type. On the pages of the book are poems gathered and carefully written by its first owner. Some are famous poems while others are original work by family members. My grandmother and even my father have some original poems hand written by them in this treasured book. The book is titled, “Gathered Fragments” and this verse is written in beautiful penmanship on the first page.

old journal 2

These words in scripture were actually an instruction by Jesus to his disciples after the miraculous feeding of five thousand people. The crowd which gathered to hear Jesus was hungry. It was lunchtime and the people were without food. Most of them had come spontaneously without planning ahead even enough to have brought lunches. Rather than going home, the disciples found a little boy with a small lunch of five loaves of bread and two small fish. After blessing the food, Jesus broke it into pieces, and offered it to the hungry crowd who consumed it eagerly. Then, when the crowd had eaten all they wanted, the disciples were told to “Gather up the fragments, that nothing be lost.”

Isn’t that a beautiful instruction? How do you gather fragments? Do you have a collection of some kind? Perhaps you collect rocks, coins, or stamps. Maybe you like to make scrapbooks? Do you keep old photos and relics from years gone by; polished and put in a place of honor in your home or give them away as special gifts? My father has a plaque hanging in his home of an old letter he wrote to his mother from camp when he was a child. His sister found the letter and made a very special birthday gift for him one year. Maybe you have carefully held onto family heirlooms so you can pass them to the next generation. Or perhaps, you gather fragments in other ways. Maybe you can or freeze garden vegetables for winter eating or maybe you gather and dry herbs, fruits, or vegetables.

canned food

I have written about this concept before. In fact this blog post is drawn from a previously published magazine article I once wrote. But as I thought about our topic this month, this verse and practice kept coming to my mind. I think one of the best ways to keep costs down is to have a habit of gathering things that can be reused at another time by us or by others.

When the disciples gathered the fragments in the Bible story, they had twelve baskets left over. Though this was a miraculous occurrence, the underlying principle is still valid. If you or I form fragment gathering habits, we will find abundance in our lives too. And so will others whom we bless with our fragments–carefully gathered and lovingly given.

Click to tweet:  “Gather up the fragments, that nothing be lost.”

Writing Prompt: Share about something you gather and reuse. How do you keep / alter it for future use? How/ when do you use it again?

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